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    #1

    adverb after feel

    Hello, teachers.
    As far as I know, abjective is used after 'feel'
    Then what about this sentence that I encountered.

    The study revealed that people tend to have a greater affection toward names that are easy to pronounce than those that are hard to pronounce and that people would feel more positively toward names that are relatively easy to pronounce.

    Is it okay?
    If it is can you tell me why?
    Thank you.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: adverb after feel

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennie Lee View Post
    Hello, teachers.
    As far as I know, abjective is used after 'feel'
    Then what about this sentence that I encountered.

    The study revealed that people tend to have a greater affection toward names that are easy to pronounce than those that are hard to pronounce and that people would feel more positively toward names that are relatively easy to pronounce.

    Is it okay?
    If it is can you tell me why?
    Thank you.
    I feel strongly that whether you use an adjective or an adverb depends on what you want to say.
    Yes, it's OK. There's probably little difference between feeling positive toward something and feeling positively toward it. The meaning is technically different but, pragmatically, in this case they mean the same.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: adverb after feel

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennie Lee View Post
    Hello, teachers.
    As far as I know, abjective is used after 'feel'
    Then what about this sentence that I encountered.

    The study revealed that people tend to have a greater affection toward names that are easy to pronounce than those that are hard to pronounce and that people would feel more positively toward names that are relatively easy to pronounce.

    Is it okay?
    If it is can you tell me why?
    Thank you.
    I agree with Raymott, but I would choose the adjective "positive".

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    #4

    Re: adverb after feel

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I feel strongly that whether you use an adjective or an adverb depends on what you want to say.
    Yes, it's OK. There's probably little difference between feeling positive toward something and feeling positively toward it. The meaning is technically different but, pragmatically, in this case they mean the same.
    Thank you for your kind answer.
    Have a wonderful day.

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    #5

    Re: adverb after feel

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I agree with Raymott, but I would choose the adjective "positive".
    Thank you for your kind answer.
    And can I ask you the reason that you would choose adjective in this case?
    The suttle difference between expressions is always difficult to grasp.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: adverb after feel

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennie Lee View Post
    Thank you for your kind answer.
    And can I ask you the reason that you would choose adjective in this case?
    The subtle difference between expressions is always difficult to grasp.
    I don't see any difference in meaning, but technically, the adverb is wrong grammatically. In that use, "feel" is a linking verb and it should take an adjective. You will, however, run across the use of the adverb in that construction. By the way, Raymott's use of "I feel strongly" is considered correct because "feel" is not a linking verb in that case.

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    #7

    Re: adverb after feel

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I don't see any difference in meaning, but technically, the adverb is wrong grammatically. In that use, "feel" is a linking verb and it should take an adjective. You will, however, run across the use of the adverb in that construction. By the way, Raymott's use of "I feel strongly" is considered correct because "feel" is not a linking verb in that case.
    Thank you.
    What I'd like to know was whether the use of adverb is technically correct in the above sentence.."feel positively toward.... ."
    And your answer really helped.

    And "I feel strongly" is wonderful example that "feel" doesn't need any abjective. (Thank you, Raymott.)

  4. probus's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: adverb after feel

    We are not very big on technically correct here. We prefer to focus on actual current usage: "English as she is spoke" in the words of the 19th century Portuguese writer Pedro Carolino.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: adverb after feel

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    We are not very big on technically correct here. We prefer to focus on actual current usage: "English as she is spoke" in the words of the 19th century Portuguese writer Pedro Carolino.
    Well, I have my limits in that regard. The OP's original use of "positively" is only a minor error. By contrast, "Me and Bobby be going to the park" is another matter.

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    #10

    Re: adverb after feel

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    We are not very big on technically correct here. We prefer to focus on actual current usage: "English as she is spoke" in the words of the 19th century Portuguese writer Pedro Carolino.
    Whether we concern ourselves with "technically correct" or not depends very much on the purpose of what is being written. In exams and formal situations, we generally recommend the grammatically correct version of almost everything. When people are going to be chatting to their friends or at a party, we're more likely to tell them how we actually speak on a day-to-day basis.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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