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    #1

    Does "noodles" sound childish?

    Is "noodles" a babyish word? I think Chinese students are using this word everywhere, because the text books didn't tell us there is "pasta".

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    #2

    Re: Does "noodles" sound childish?

    'Noodles' is not at all a childish word. Read the Wikipedia article about it.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Does "noodles" sound childish?

    Noodles and pasta aren't the same thing.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Does "noodles" sound childish?

    Quote Originally Posted by registered View Post
    Is "noodles" a babyish word? I think Chinese students are using this word everywhere, because the text books didn't tell us there is "pasta".
    Using 'noodles' for spaghetti is OK, but for forms of pasta like lasagne or cannelloni, which have nothing like a noodle in them, is wrong.
    'Noodle' refers to certain form; 'pasta' refers to what the item is made of. "Spaghetti noodles" is sometimes used because this is pasta in a noodle form.
    (Not a chef)

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Does "noodles" sound childish?

    If someone told me they were having noodles in tomato sauce, I would not think they meant spaghetti. I would assume they meant egg noodles, rice noodles etc. If they meant spaghetti (usually made of durum wheat, spelt etc), I would expect them to say spaghetti.

    In the UK, "noodles" is used almost exclusively for the Asian variety (Chinese, Thai etc).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: Does "noodles" sound childish?

    Quote Originally Posted by registered View Post
    Is "noodles" a babyish word? I think Chinese students are using this word everywhere, because the text books didn't tell us there is "pasta".
    It doesn't sound babyish at all to me, and pasta doesn't sound more mature- just more Italian.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Does "noodles" sound childish?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If someone told me they were having noodles in tomato sauce, I would not think they meant spaghetti. I would assume they meant egg noodles, rice noodles etc. If they meant spaghetti (usually made of durum wheat, spelt etc), I would expect them to say spaghetti.

    In the UK, "noodles" is used almost exclusively for the Asian variety (Chinese, Thai etc).
    Nevertheless, I think that strands of spaghetti are noodles, are they not?
    Noodle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    I'm not familiar with durum wheat, spelt, etc. Maybe spaghetti can't be noodles? - though plenty of cooks on Google use the term.
    Last edited by Raymott; 30-Oct-2013 at 10:31. Reason: typo

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    #8

    Re: Does "noodles" sound childish?

    I agree that spaghetti are a kind of noodle. That said, they aren't sold as or generally referred to as "noodles."

    If I ordered beef tips over noodles in a restaurant it would be very strange if they were served over spaghetti.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Does "noodles" sound childish?

    Yes, I agree with SoothingDave. I can't deny that spaghetti is a type of noodle but I don't eat "noodle bolognese", I eat "spaghetti bolognese". Equally, I don't order "stir-fried vegetables with spaghetti", I order "stir-fried vegetables with noodles".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Does "noodles" sound childish?

    Alright, so how serious is this problem? Are Chinese students calling non-noodle-like pasta, eg. lasagne, 'noodles'?
    The OP hasn't actually said what is being called noodles.
    You can actually buy "Spaghetti noodles" somewhere in UK (I'm assuming, since the price is in pounds).
    Ocado: Orgran Rice & Corn Spaghetti Noodles (Product Information)

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