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  1. Cap1034
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    #1

    Future or Present Tense?


    Does this present continuous imply a future event here? Or does it imply it is in the process of being cancelled here?

    Your request to subscribe to the newsletter has remained unconfirmed for more than 48h and is being cancelled. If you

    want it executed, but you were unable to send the confirmation in time,
    then just re-issue the command to get a new confirmation code. The one
    you were sent before can no longer be used.

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    #2

    Re: Future or Present Tense?

    It is in the process of being cancelled. It could also say "has been cancelled." It's probably better that way, unless the cancellation takes some amount of time.

    More than likely, by the time you read the note, the cancellation is a completed event.

  2. Cap1034
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    #3

    Re: Future or Present Tense?

    But to say it means future like, "I'm going to the US this week." is also possible?

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    #4

    Re: Future or Present Tense?

    No. It is describing an event that is happening now. If they meant they would cancel in the future, they would say "your request will be cancelled." Or "is going to be cancelled."

  3. Cap1034
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    #5

    Re: Future or Present Tense?

    I see. Thank you.

  4. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Future or Present Tense?

    Quote Originally Posted by jamesmorgan View Post
    But to say it means future like, "I'm going to the US this week." is also possible? It is possible in this sentence, but not in your original sentence.
    I just want to clarify a response that has previously been given to this question. It seems to me that this question is separate from your original post. If that is the case, the answer is that we frequently use the present continuous to signify a planned futere event. "She's coming for a visit next month."

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    #7

    Re: Future or Present Tense?

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    I just want to clarify a response that has previously been given to this question. It seems to me that this question is separete from your original post. If that is the case, the answer is that we frequently use the present continuous to signify a planned future event. "She's coming for a visit next month."
    Good point. Note that you need time or other context clues in the sentence.

    "I'm driving to New York." vs "I'm driving to New York next week."

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