Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Current Location:
      • Saudi Arabia

    • Join Date: Aug 2012
    • Posts: 1,617
    #1

    "Go away! We have adult talk."

    If you want a child to leave the place where you and other person discussing a sensitive issue that contain some words/expressions not suitable to children to listen to. What is the natural expression that we can say in this situation, please?


    A non-native speaker (of course, a doctor majoring in English) said the following while he was lecturing in the classroom:

    "Go away! We have adult talk." I donít know if this is correct, please?


  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,092
    #2

    Re: "Go away! We have adult talk."

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    If you want a child to leave the place where you and other person discussing a sensitive issue that contain some words/expressions not suitable to children to listen to. What is the natural expression that we can say in this situation, please?


    A non-native speaker (of course, a doctor majoring in English) said the following while he was lecturing in the classroom:

    "Go away! We have adult talk." I don’t know if this is correct, please?

    "We're having an adults talk." You should use the progressive here.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #3

    Re: "Go away! We have adult talk."

    It's also a very rude way to talk to anyone, including a child.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,092
    #4

    Re: "Go away! We have adult talk."

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    It's also a very rude way to talk to anyone, including a child.
    Yes, I was trying to think of a phrase to replace the "Go away!" part, but couldn't.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,875
    #5

    Re: "Go away! We have adult talk."

    I hear "Please be quiet. The grownups are talking now" quite a lot. There's no polite way to say "Go away!" but if you actually need them to leave the room, you can say "Please go to your room/go into the garden" etc. If you just need them to stop talking while you're talking to another adult, then "Please be quiet. I'm talking to another adult now. Thanks" or words to that effect.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #6

    Re: "Go away! We have adult talk."

    Depending on how old the child is, something like "Mommy needs you to go play in the other room for a little while. Mrs. Smith and I need to have a grown-up conversation" could work. An older child could be told "Mrs. Smith and I need some privacy. We're having an adult conversation and it's not for your ears." (I'm pretty sure if my mother had said that, I'd do my best to hide as close as possible to hear what they were saying.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. difference between "talk to" and "talk with"
    By kofufet in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 20-Jun-2013, 11:21
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Sep-2012, 10:51
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Mar-2012, 06:24
  4. [Vocabulary] What's the difference between "speak" and "talk"?
    By Minhaz in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24-Jul-2010, 08:00
  5. "develop into an adult" and "grow up into an adult"
    By Daruma in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 18-Aug-2009, 22:14

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •