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  1. Banned
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    #1

    See

    In some news article:

    "Ford angers the city's gay community by declining to attend either the city's gay pride parade or the flag raising ceremony to kick off Pride week. Ford said he would be at the family cottage for the parade. His decision broke with tradition that saw the city's three previous mayors march in the parade."

    What does "see" really mean there? People can "see" a mayor march in parade. But how does tradition "see" anything at all?

    Source: news.yahoo.com/chronology-controversies-involving-toronto-mayor-rob-ford-162152686.html

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: See

    Quote Originally Posted by johnchu View Post
    In some news article:

    "Ford angers the city's gay community by declining to attend either the city's gay pride parade or the flag raising ceremony to kick off Pride week. Ford said he would be at the family cottage for the parade. His decision broke with tradition that saw the city's three previous mayors march in the parade."

    What does "see" really mean there? People can "see" a mayor march in parade. But how does tradition "see" anything at all?

    Source: news.yahoo.com/chronology-controversies-involving-toronto-mayor-rob-ford-162152686.html
    That's an idiomatic use of "see". Yes, it does mean that "tradition saw" in a metaphorical sense.
    Another example:
    "Last month saw an increase in sales figures."

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    #3

    Re: See

    According to this dictionary ( learnersdictionary.com/definition/see ) , a seemingly good definition of "see" for this usage is:

    "14. to be the place or time in which (something) happens "

    But tradition is neither a place nor a time. So, would this following corrected version be better:

    "...His decision broke with tradition times that saw the city's three previous mayors march in the parade."

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: See

    Quote Originally Posted by johnchu View Post
    So, would this following corrected version be better:

    "...His decision broke with tradition times that saw the city's three previous mayors march in the parade."
    No. It's not correct. The original is.

  5. Banned
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    #5

    Re: See

    "Tradition" is a way of doing things (method). I cannot find a definition that read something along the lines of:

    "to be the method by which (something) happens"

    Or, is it that "tradition" has the meaning of "time"?

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    #6

    Re: See

    Quote Originally Posted by johnchu View Post
    "Tradition" is a way of doing things (method). I cannot find a definition that read something along the lines of:

    "to be the method by which (something) happens"
    I doubt if you will. Why would you want to?
    Or, is it that "tradition" has the meaning of "time"?
    No.

    You appear to be trying to shoehorn 'tradition' into a dictionary definition of 'see' that happens not to include all the things than can 'see' an event.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 03-Nov-2013 at 00:26. Reason: Fixing typo

  7. Banned
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    #7

    Re: See

    Then, I could write something like this:

    "The scientific method saw scientists succeed."

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: See

    Quote Originally Posted by johnchu View Post
    Then, I could write something like this:

    "The scientific method saw scientists succeed."
    That's not very natural.

    The Victorian age saw the invention of the hot water shower.
    1989 saw the fall of the Berlin Wall.
    1969 saw the first man set foot on the moon.
    Last year saw the first rise in interest rates in the UK for over five years.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: See

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    That's not very natural.

    The Victorian age saw the invention of the hot water shower.
    1989 saw the fall of the Berlin Wall.
    1969 saw the first man set foot on the moon.
    Last year saw the first rise in interest rates in the UK for over five years.

    So, the original example:

    "His decision broke with tradition that saw the city's three previous mayors march in the parade."

    is just as unnatural?

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    #10

    Re: See

    Quote Originally Posted by johnchu View Post
    So, the original example:

    "His decision broke with tradition that saw the city's three previous mayors march in the parade."

    is just as unnatural?
    It's ungrammatical. In my opinion, the word "the" should appear before "tradition".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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