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    #1

    If you have a legitimate problem during the exam

    If you have a legitimate problem during the exam, raise your hand and talk quietly to the invigilator.

    I was wondering if it is incorrect to use "in" to replace "during" in the above sentence. Does "you" refer to all candidates? If the answer is "yes", is it possible to use "hands" in the above sentence?

    Thanks.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: If you have a legitimate problem during the exam

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    If you have a legitimate problem during the exam, raise your hand and talk quietly to the invigilator.

    I was wondering if it is incorrect to use "in" to replace "during" in the above sentence. Does "you" refer to all candidates? If the answer is "yes", is it possible to use "hands" in the above sentence?

    Thanks.
    Even though "in" wouldn't be completely wrong, "during" is the most natural word. "You" does refer to all candidates. However, if it said "hands", it would mean that in order to attract the attention of the invigilator, each person has to raise both their hands. That would not make sense.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: If you have a legitimate problem during the exam

    Invigilator is a totally new word for me. In the US, we call this person the proctor.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: If you have a legitimate problem during the exam

    Quote Originally Posted by riquecohen View Post
    Invigilator is a totally new word for me. In the US, we call this person the proctor.
    It's the standard word in BrE for the person who oversees a room full of people taking an exam. What they do is "to invigilate".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: If you have a legitimate problem during the exam

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Even though "in" wouldn't be completely wrong, "during" is the most natural word. "You" does refer to all candidates. However, if it said "hands", it would mean that in order to attract the attention of the invigilator, each person has to raise both their hands. That would not make sense.
    Does "During the exam" means from the beginning to the end of the exam wheras "in" does not have the same meaning?
    Last edited by Winwin2011; 04-Nov-2013 at 18:05.

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    #6

    Re: If you have a legitimate problem during the exam

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Does "During the exam" means from the beginning to the end of the exam wheras "in" does not have the same meaning?
    Could anyone help, please?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: If you have a legitimate problem during the exam

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Does "During the exam" means from the beginning to the end of the exam wheras "in" does not have the same meaning?
    No. They both have roughly the same meaning but, as ems has already said, "Even though "in" wouldn't be completely wrong, "during" is the most natural word".

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: If you have a legitimate problem during the exam

    "Problems in the exam" could mean "problems with the exam". That doesn't cover problems like the need for a toilet break, or the onset of a severe migraine, which are potential "problems during the exam".

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    #9

    Re: If you have a legitimate problem during the exam

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It's the standard word in BrE for the person who oversees a room full of people taking an exam. What they do is "to invigilate".
    If an invigilator invigilates, does a proctor proct?

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    #10

    Re: If you have a legitimate problem during the exam

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    If an invigilator invigilates, does a proctor proct?
    Possibly, but I think a proctor would proctor, just as a doctor doctors.

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