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    #1

    to be out in front

    Hi,

    I'm really in trouble with the context I'm dealing with!

    When Kenny was in charge at Blackburn, and they were out in front in the title race...

    What does mean "they were out in front...?

    and title race? what does it mean?!

    Thanks

  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to be out in front

    Title race, as I view it, is a "race", or competition, in sport for getting the title of the champion.
    As to "they were out in front in the title race", I am not sure, but it might be that they were the first to pop out of the competition.)))
    Last edited by englishhobby; 04-Nov-2013 at 19:55.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: to be out in front

    "Out in front" means they were in the lead. During the year, first place in the race for the title usually chops and changes between several teams. One week, Manchester United might be in the lead, the following week it might be Spurs etc etc. In the piece you quoted, at the time the writer is talking about "Kenny (Dalglish?) was the manager of Blackburn FC and, at that time, they were in the lead in the championship/league".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to be out in front

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "Out in front" means they were in the lead. During the year, first place in the race for the title usually chops and changes between several teams. One week, Manchester United might be in the lead, the following week it might be Spurs etc etc. In the piece you quoted, at the time the writer is talking about "Kenny (Dalglish?) was the manager of Blackburn FC and, at that time, they were in the lead in the championship/league".
    My guess was wrong.)))
    Last edited by englishhobby; 09-Nov-2013 at 13:05.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

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