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    #1

    fainted and faint

    Dear teachers,

    "She suddenly got fainted."
    "She fainted suddenly."

    Is there any difference you can spot here?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: fainted and faint

    Yes. The first one is incorrect.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: fainted and faint

    Quote Originally Posted by kite View Post
    Dear teachers,

    "She suddenly got fainted."
    "She fainted suddenly."

    Is there any difference you can spot here?
    Yes. The first is incorrect; the second is correct.
    The first would be correct with "faint" instead of "fainted"

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    #4

    Re: fainted and faint

    Oh! Really? Till now, I have been using it as #1. I felt some doubt when I just looked it up in dictionary. I searched for "fainted", but I couldn't find it. What I could find is "faint" and I doubted. It's okay. Now it's clear.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: fainted and faint

    Suddenly, she felt faint.
    Suddenly, she became faint.
    Suddenly, she got faint. (This isn't entirely natural.)

    Suddenly, she fainted.

    The first three mean that she felt dizzy and felt as if she was about to faint. The fourth means she actually fainted (passed out).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: fainted and faint

    I'm glad ems pointed out that the meaning is not the same. I can feel faint without fainting.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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