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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jan 2013
    • Posts: 563
    #1

    Go over with

    At the end of the tournament we moved to buy both him and Nani, who I went to see for myself. What attracted me to Nani was his pace, strength and aerial ability. He had two fine feet. All the individual attributes were there, which brought us round to the old question: what type of boy was he? Answer: a good one, quiet, could speak English reasonably well, never caused any problems at Sporting Lisbon, and was an excellent trainer. My word he’s a fit boy. Gymnastic, too. His athletic read-outs were always first-class. So the foundations were there. Carlos went over with David Gill: called into Sporting Lisbon to sign Nani and then drove up to Porto to capture Anderson. All in one day.

    Hi,

    The underlined phrase,does it means Carlos concured with David Gill to call into the Spoting Lisbon?

    and Gymnastic, too. Gymnastic is a noun not an adjective. So what does it mean?


    about the word "who", doesn't sound odd? It would have been "whom". right?
    Last edited by Sepmre; 09-Nov-2013 at 14:48.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,479
    #2

    Re: Go over with

    '...went over with' means they travelled to Portugal together.

    'Gymnastic' is an adjective.

    'Whom' would have been more grammatical but many native speakers never use the word.

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