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    #1

    A rhodesian ridgeback on a leash, a lethal devil unleashed.

    A rhodesian ridgeback on a leash, a lethal devil unleashed.

    Hello, does the saying above make sense and comply with the English semantics and syntax?

    Thank you for correction.

    Waawe

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A rhodesian ridgeback on a leash, a lethal devil unleashed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Waawe View Post
    A rhodesian ridgeback on a leash, a lethal devil unleashed.

    Hello, does the saying above make sense and comply with the English semantics and syntax?

    Thank you for correction.

    Waawe
    It doesn't make sense.

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    #3

    Re: A rhodesian ridgeback on a leash, a lethal devil unleashed.

    Here is the story. A friend of mine was talking about her dog. She said jokingly: 'He is a typical rhodesian ridgeback when he is on a leash but once I take it off, he turns into a killing devil.'

    For a reason, she asked me what it would sound like as a few-word English slogan. Seems I have failed. And I was so proud of my original sentence. can you bring up a slogan to please my friend's childish soul? Seems I haven't studied enough for the task.
    Last edited by Waawe; 10-Nov-2013 at 01:34. Reason: Completion

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: A rhodesian ridgeback on a leash, a lethal devil unleashed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Waawe View Post
    A rhodesian ridgeback on a leash, a lethal devil unleashed.

    Hello, does the saying above make sense and comply with the English semantics and syntax?

    Thank you for correction.

    Waawe
    Thanks for the context. I don't know why someone would want a slogan that applies to a single animal, but here are a few possibilities.

    When leashed, a typical Rhodesian Ridgeback; when unleashed, a lethal devil.
    When leashed, friendly as Lassie; when unleashed, mean as Cujo.
    When leashed, a family pet; when unleashed, a junkyard dog.

    You should capitalize Rhodesian and Ridgeback.

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    #5

    Re: A rhodesian ridgeback on a leash, a lethal devil unleashed.

    Thank you, my friend, we, ordinary people, can't understand cynologists, I'm afraid. They love their pets more than people. Your reply is exactly what she wanna get. Take care. Waawe

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: A rhodesian ridgeback on a leash, a lethal devil unleashed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Waawe View Post
    Thank you, my friend, we, ordinary people, can't understand cynologists, I'm afraid. They love their pets more than people. Your reply is exactly what she wanna get. Take care. Waawe
    Even if we did encourage the use of text-style words, like "wanna" (and we do not!), this is not the right use. You can't use it with the third-person singular, which requires "wants" instead of "want."

    This woman would do better to invest in training for her dog instead of cute phrases to describe it, or she will find herself with an enormous law suit one day.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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