Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary

    • Join Date: May 2011
    • Posts: 47
    #1

    will

    I have got two questions.
    1. Does 'will' in this sentence "I will drop you a message" mean that it might or might not be fulfilled?
    2. What is the difference between saying "I shall drop you a message" and "I will drop you a message"? What does 'I shall drop you a message' imply?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,905
    #2

    Re: will

    For me, they mean the same. "Shall" is heard less often.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2010
    • Posts: 1,696
    #3

    Re: will

    Quote Originally Posted by Lily of the valley View Post
    I have got two questions.
    1. Does 'will' in this sentence "I will drop you a message" mean that it might or might not be fulfilled? No.
    2. What is the difference between saying "I shall drop you a message" and "I will drop you a message"? What does 'I shall drop you a message' imply?
    "shall" is more formal than "will". Beyond that, there is little difference. I'm not sure how one "drops" a message but it sounds roughly like, "I will send you a message". If you say "I will", or "I shall", it is a promise. If you say "I may", or "I might", the event may or may not occur.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary

    • Join Date: May 2011
    • Posts: 47
    #4

    Re: will

    That is just what I am interested in: that "little difference" :)

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 2
    #5

    Re: will

    The person uses "will" in this situation because the decision to do it was made during speaking. "Shall" is used in the UK, but it is more commonly used as follows:


    • Shall we go out tonight?
    • Shall we get tea started?


    It is a suggestion that is used when we expect a "yes" in return.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #6

    Re: will

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    "shall" is more formal than "will".
    I don't agree. When it comes to expressing futurity, some of my generation (ancient) of BrE speakers still insist on the shall/will difference. For such people, observation of the difference is 'more correct', but I don't think that even they would say that it's more formal.

    I don't know why I say 'they'. I am one of them in my non-teaching life.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary

    • Join Date: May 2011
    • Posts: 47
    #7

    Re: will

    This is just what I was taught,that is why I don't understand why the speaker used 'shall' instead of 'will'.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #8

    Re: will

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    "shall" is more formal than "will". Beyond that, there is little difference. I'm not sure how one "drops" a message but it sounds roughly like, "I will send you a message". If you say "I will", or "I shall", it is a promise. If you say "I may", or "I might", the event may or may not occur.
    I agree with you that, in AmE, "shall" is usually considered more formal than "will". And it is used far less often.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #9

    Re: will

    Quote Originally Posted by Lily of the valley View Post
    This is just what I was taught,that is why I don't understand why the speaker used 'shall' instead of 'will'.
    The usage difference between shall and will is largely based on tradition with British English. The distinction was not as clearly delineated in AmE and was seldom observed. At one time there was a difference between using "shall" with the first person (simple futurity) and using "shall" with the second and third persons (promise, command, or threat). With that "rule" in mind, "will" is used for simple futurity in the second and third person, and for desire or intention in the first person. From what I have learned from my British colleagues, including the British posters here, the distinctions are fading. Also the use of modals in the English language is, and always has been, very complicated.

    You can read more about this here: Shall and will - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Hungary
      • Current Location:
      • Hungary

    • Join Date: May 2011
    • Posts: 47
    #10

    Re: will

    That is all clear but what about 'shall' when it is used in the first person nowadays?Is it simple futurity?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •