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    #1

    was running/had been running

    Hi everyone,
    Please correct me if I am wrong.

    1. When I was walking in the park I saw John who was running.
    2. When I was walking in the park I saw John who had been running.
    3. When I was walking in the park I saw John who had been running there since 5 o'clock.

    I personally understand these sentences as follows:

    1.When I was walking in the park I saw John who was running. (I was in the process of walking and he was in the process of running.)

    2. When I was walking in the park I saw John who had been running. (I was in the process of walking and he had just stopped running and was probably sitting on the ground and having some rest.)

    3. When I was walking in the park I saw John who had been running there since 5 o'clock. (I was in the process of walking and he was in the process of running but it is specified here that he started running before I reached the park.)

    Thank you.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: was running/had been running

    Quote Originally Posted by worcester View Post
    Hi everyone,
    Please correct me if I am wrong.

    1. When I was walking in the park I saw John who was running.
    2. When I was walking in the park I saw John who had been running.
    3. When I was walking in the park I saw John who had been running there since 5 o'clock.

    I personally understand these sentences as follows:

    1.When I was walking in the park I saw John who was running. (I was in the process of walking and he was in the process of running.)

    2. When I was walking in the park I saw John who had been running. (I was in the process of walking and he had just stopped running and was probably sitting on the ground and having some rest.)

    3. When I was walking in the park I saw John who had been running there since 5 o'clock. (I was in the process of walking and he was in the process of running but it is specified here that he started running before I reached the park.)

    Thank you.
    1. I agree with your interpretation.
    2. I agree with the beginning of your interpretation but I definitely don't agree that he is now sitting on the ground having a rest. All we know is that he is no longer running.
    3. I agree with the beginning of your interpretation but we don't know that he had started running there before you reached the park. What time you reached the park is not specified. You might have been walking in the park since 4.55 or 3.20 or any other time.

    In all your sentences, you need to put a comma after "John".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: was running/had been running

    Quote Originally Posted by worcester View Post

    1. When I was walking in the park I saw John who was running.
    2. When I was walking in the park I saw John who had been running.
    3. When I was walking in the park I saw John who had been running there since 5 o'clock.
    All three need a comma after 'John'.
    I personally understand these sentences as follows:

    1.(I was in the process of walking and he was in the process of running.)
    2. (I was in the process of walking and he had just stopped running and was probably sitting on the ground and having some rest.)
    3. (I was in the process of walking and he was in the process of running but it is specified here that he started running before I reached the park.)
    That's how I understand them, with the reservations expressed by ems.

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