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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    a conditional clause.

    You don't like Pizza. However, you ordered it at the restaurant already!

    Your father uses a sentence containing a conditional clause.

    What is your father's sentence?


    ( I don't have any clue about changing this sentence into a conditional one. I'd be happy if you help me.)

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a conditional clause.

    Why did you order pizza if you don't like it?

    This is not really a conditional sentence in the sense of the possibility of one situation depending on another. We could use when in that sentence with very little difference in meaning.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: a conditional clause.

    How about "If you liked pizza, it would make sense that you ordered it at the restaurant"?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: a conditional clause.

    I agree with you. What about saying:

    If you don't like pizza, you don't order that. ( Zero conditional)
    But as you see, it has nothing to do with the purpose of the person who made up this question!

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    #5

    Re: a conditional clause.

    Quote Originally Posted by Freeguy View Post
    I agree with you. What about saying:

    If you don't like pizza, you don't order that. ( Zero conditional)
    But as you see, it has nothing to do with the purpose of the person who made up this question!
    I would find that more natural without the second "you" - If you don't like pizza, don't order it!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Senior Member
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    #6

    Re: a conditional clause.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I would find that more natural without the second "you" - If you don't like pizza, don't order it!
    What about this one. Is it correct?

    If you don't like pizza, you shouldn't have ordered it!

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    #7

    Re: a conditional clause.

    Quote Originally Posted by Freeguy View Post
    What about this one. Is it correct?

    If you don't like pizza, you shouldn't have ordered it!
    Yes.

  8. Senior Member
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    #8

    Re: a conditional clause.

    Do we have zero and third mixed conditional?

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    #9

    Re: a conditional clause.

    There is no such thing.

  10. Senior Member
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    #10

    Re: a conditional clause.

    If you don't like pizza, you shouldn't have ordered it! ( The first part is Zero and The second part is third conditional. Correct me If I'm wrong! )

    As far as I know, we have only two mixed conditionals. second third and vice versa. However, I've seen in FCE GOLD book that we can use zero and third conditional together as a mixed one. I need your confirmation as always!

    Thanks

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