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  1. Banned
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    #1

    Outpace

    I am not sure about the usage of the verb "outpace" ( businessinsider.com/10-most-powerful-militaries-in-the-world-2013-6 ) :

    "Nuclear capabilities are not included in this calculation but Russia and the United States far outpace the rest of the world in nuclear armament, with 8,500 and 7,700 nuclear weapons, respectively."

    This particular usage suggest that "outpace" is a continuous state verb (is better than). But dictionaries suggest that "outpace" should be a one-off action verb (become better). What do native speakers think?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Outpace

    Quote Originally Posted by toughit View Post
    I am not sure about the usage of the verb "outpace" ( businessinsider.com/10-most-powerful-militaries-in-the-world-2013-6 ) :

    "Nuclear capabilities are not included in this calculation — but Russia and the United States far outpace the rest of the world in nuclear armament, with 8,500 and 7,700 nuclear weapons, respectively."

    This particular usage suggest that "outpace" is a continuous state verb (is better than). But dictionaries suggest that "outpace" should be a one-off action verb (become better). What do native speakers think?
    In this use, "outpace" means "surpass" or "outdo".

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    #3

    Re: Outpace

    Quote Originally Posted by toughit View Post
    I am not sure about the usage of the verb "outpace" ( businessinsider.com/10-most-powerful-militaries-in-the-world-2013-6 ) :

    "Nuclear capabilities are not included in this calculation but Russia and the United States far outpace the rest of the world in nuclear armament, with 8,500 and 7,700 nuclear weapons, respectively."

    This particular usage suggest that "outpace" is a continuous state verb (is better than). But dictionaries suggest that "outpace" should be a one-off action verb (become better). What do native speakers think?
    To outpace is not to do something better, it is closer to doing something faster or having more of something. Pace means a step that a person takes while walking. If I can do forty paces in a minute and you can do fifty - you outpace me. The sales of GM products are far out pacing the sale of Ford products - GM is selling more than Ford. In your sample sentence above it is stated that Russian and the United States have more nuclear weapons than the rest of the world combined.

  3. Banned
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    #4

    Re: Outpace

    So, "outpace" is a one-time action verb (Russia defeated .....) , not a state verb (Russia is better than ....)? And "outpace" should have been in past tense?
    Last edited by toughit; 27-Nov-2013 at 00:53.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Outpace

    Quote Originally Posted by toughit View Post
    So, "outpace" is a one-time action verb (Russia defeated .....) , not a state verb (Russia is better than ....)? And "outpace" should have been in past tense?
    No, it is fine in the present tense. Russia and the US currently have more nuclear weapons than the rest of the world.

  5. Banned
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    #6

    Re: Outpace

    So, "outpace" is a continuous-state verb (Russia & USA are better than the rest of the world with respect to nuclear weapons)?

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Outpace

    Quote Originally Posted by toughit View Post
    So, "outpace" is a continuous-state verb (Russia & USA are better than the rest of the world with respect to nuclear weapons)?
    I would not call "outpace" a "continuous-state verb".

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    #8

    Re: Outpace

    Suppose, Peter currently has better school grades than Joseph. Can I write:

    "Peter outpaces Joseph in academic performance."

    where "outpace" is in present tense?

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    #9

    Re: Outpace

    So, every time this troll starts a thread, it will be closed.
    So, I'm not sure what the point is.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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