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    #1

    see

    I ............ (see/seeing) Julia in the hallway. Want me to get that file from her? [Summit 2, pp. 11, Joan Saslow and Allen Ascher]

    I don't know why the answer is only 'see' and 'seeing is wrong. Is 'see' a stative verb?

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: see

    Quote Originally Posted by atabitaraf View Post
    Is 'see' a stative verb?
    That's not relevant. We can't have 'I seeing'.

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    #3

    Re: see

    What about 'I am seeing Julia in the hallway....' in this example?

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    #4

    Re: see

    Quote Originally Posted by atabitaraf View Post
    What about 'I am seeing Julia in the hallway....' in this example?
    That doesn't work in BrE. I believe it might be acceptable in Indian English. In BrE, we would say simply "I [can] see Julia in the hallway". We might use the present progressive to denote the future if we include a future time marker in the sentence, ie "I am seeing Julia later today". There "I am seeing" means "I will meet up with".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: see

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    That doesn't work in BrE. I believe it might be acceptable in Indian English. In BrE, we would say simply "I [can] see Julia in the hallway". We might use the present progressive to denote the future if we include a future time marker in the sentence, ie "I am seeing Julia later today". There "I am seeing" means "I will meet up with".
    Do you have any rule about 'not using ing with see'? Is it a kind of stative verb or something?

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    #6

    Re: see

    Quote Originally Posted by atabitaraf View Post
    Do you have any rule about 'not using ing with see'? Is it a kind of stative verb or something?
    No, don't think that way. The unmarked meaning in your sentence is being aware of somebody using your eyes, if you like.

    You can say:
    I'm seeing Julia in the hallway.
    to convey the idea of a rather utter surprise, almost disbelief, that you see her there.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: see

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    No, don't think that way. The unmarked meaning in your sentence is being aware of somebody using your eyes, if you like.

    You can say:
    I'm seeing Julia in the hallway.
    to convey the idea of a rather utter surprise, almost disbelief, that you see her there.
    I don't disagree, but it should be mentioned that there are still many teachers who teach and believe that sense verbs cannot be used in the progressive form. Students should know that.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: see

    VERY generally, we do tend to say "I see a ship on the horizon" not "I am seeing a ship on the horizon."
    VERY generally, we do tend to say "I hear music coming from that room" not "I am hearing music coming from that room."
    VERY generally, we do tend to say, "I smell something amazing! What's for dinner?" not "I am smelling something amazing..."

    If we use the progressive tense, it suggests a temporary situation (Okay, now I'm seeing the ship... no, it's out of focus again... okay, now I'm seeing it clearly) or something otherwise unusual (I'm smelling something foul... let's find out where it's coming from.)

    You will be taught first that these verbs are not used in the progressive (for the present) and then you will learn the exceptions.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #9

    Re: see

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    VERY generally, we do tend to say "I see a ship on the horizon" not "I am seeing a ship on the horizon."
    VERY generally, we do tend to say "I hear music coming from that room" not "I am hearing music coming from that room."
    VERY generally, we do tend to say, "I smell something amazing! What's for dinner?" not "I am smelling something amazing..."

    If we use the progressive tense, it suggests a temporary situation (Okay, now I'm seeing the ship... no, it's out of focus again... okay, now I'm seeing it clearly) or something otherwise unusual (I'm smelling something foul... let's find out where it's coming from.)

    You will be taught first that these verbs are not used in the progressive (for the present) and then you will learn the exceptions.
    I wish I could give you more than a like, thanks.
    So, the general rule says the simple present tense talks about an action that happens always. The present progressive tense talks about an action that is happening now (future plan is not our issue here.)
    Sense verbs are not usually used in progressive sense, when you are talking about ongoing actions: I see a ship on the horizon; I listen to music; I smell a nice smell.
    An exception: If you use the progressive tense, it suggests a temporary situation that is coming and going, OR something strange.

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    #10

    Re: see

    Quote Originally Posted by atabitaraf View Post
    I wish I could give you more than a like, thanks.
    So, the general rule says the simple present tense talks about an action that happens always. The present progressive tense talks about an action that is happening now (future plan is not our issue here.)
    Sense verbs are not usually used in progressive sense, when you are talking about ongoing actions: I see a ship on the horizon; I listen to music; I smell a nice smell.
    An exception: If you use the progressive tense, it suggests a temporary situation that is coming and going, OR something strange.
    McDonald's came out with an advertising campaign that used the tag phrase "I'm loving/lovin' it". English teachers cringed everywhere. But, as Barb pointed out, the customers were shown eating the product at that very time. The objections remain for some, but the majority have learned to accept that usage. It is tricky on exams however.

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