Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Oct 2013
    • Posts: 641
    #1

    In geometry, an ellipse may be defined

    In geometry, an ellipse may be defined as the locus of all points ..... distances from two fixed points is constant.

    1. which as the sum of
    2. of the sum which
    3. whose sum of whose
    4. whose sum that the


    I can't understand the structure of No.3. How can we use two whose or which, for example, together?

    Thanks!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,487
    #2

    Re: In geometry, an ellipse may be defined

    Leaving your question aside for the moment, I can't make sense of any of those alternatives.

    In future questions of this sort, please tell us what the answer key gave.

  1. alex_genius_20's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Sep 2013
    • Posts: 76
    #3

    Re: In geometry, an ellipse may be defined

    (I'm not a teacher)

    Freeguy, to me, it makes no sense too. I googled it and found it. It's a Toefl test: Sample TOEFL Structure and Written Expression Questions

    Rover, it's test number 13

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Oct 2013
    • Posts: 641
    #4

    Re: In geometry, an ellipse may be defined

    Answer key: No.3

  2. Grumpy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 972
    #5

    Re: In geometry, an ellipse may be defined

    It would be better expressed as "...the locus of all points, the sum of whose distances from two fixed points is constant.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Oct 2013
    • Posts: 641
    #6

    Re: In geometry, an ellipse may be defined

    Can we use two whose together as a general rule?

  3. Grumpy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 972
    #7

    Re: In geometry, an ellipse may be defined

    I don't know if there's any specific rule forbidding it, but it's certainly something to be avoided if at all possible - as the foregoing comments by others make clear!
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

Similar Threads

  1. [General] time-defined ?
    By paris 06 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Oct-2012, 10:09
  2. [Vocabulary] Geometry
    By atabitaraf in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 09-Mar-2012, 18:22
  3. [Grammar] may therefore be defined as its composition
    By suprunp in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-Oct-2011, 10:47
  4. Defining words, can they be defined?
    By Eudaimonia in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-Feb-2011, 23:27
  5. Geometry of an iris
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-Oct-2004, 06:30

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •