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  1. Newbie
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2013
    • Posts: 9
    #1

    A Matter of Life and Death

    "But, of course, I am already being killed, by one of natureís most common blunders. And these blunt fears are easily deconstructed as a form of denial: if Iím stuck alive in my coffin, well, that will in some sense override the final fact of my death, no? I can see these dread-filled fantasies as the wishes they are: that I really can stay in this body I love; that my consciousness really will run on past my death; that I wonít just Ö die."

    This is a part of an essay titled "
    A Matter of Life and Death" by an American writer named Marjorie Williams.
    I cannot easily see the structure of the sentence
    "I can see these dread-filled fantasies as the wishes they are"
    especially the part of "the wishes they are".

    Am I right in comprehending it as "see A as B" pattern as in "He didn't see me as a woman"?
    Then why is "the wishes" followed by "they are"
    Is the sentence grammatical? And what's the exact meaning of it?

    Please help me. Thank you.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,624
    #2

    Re: A Matter of Life and Death

    Quote Originally Posted by wsbaik View Post
    "But, of course, I am already being killed, by one of nature’s most common blunders. And these blunt fears are easily deconstructed as a form of denial: if I’m stuck alive in my coffin, well, that will in some sense override the final fact of my death, no? I can see these dread-filled fantasies as the wishes they are: that I really can stay in this body I love; that my consciousness really will run on past my death; that I won’t just … die."

    This is a part of an essay titled "
    A Matter of Life and Death" by an American writer named Marjorie Williams.
    I cannot easily see the structure of the sentence
    "I can see these dread-filled fantasies as the wishes they are"
    especially the part of "the wishes they are".

    Am I right in comprehending it as "see A as B" pattern as in "He didn't see me as a woman"?
    Then why is "the wishes" followed by "they are"
    Is the sentence grammatical? And what's the exact meaning of it?

    Please help me. Thank you.
    She can see the dread-filled fantasies of being buried alive as manifestations of her wish to remain concious, as her self, after death.

  3. Newbie
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2013
    • Posts: 9
    #3

    Re: A Matter of Life and Death

    Thank you very much for your valuable comment.
    Since i read your comment only now due to some mysterious login problem(I am a new member here),
    I posted another thread with more questions.
    Thank you very much again.

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    She can see the dread-filled fantasies of being buried alive as manifestations of her wish to remain concious, as her self, after death.

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