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    #1

    That fluid layer which has had its velocity

    That fluid layer which has had its velocity affected by the boundary shear is called the boundary layer. The velocity in the boundary layer approaches the velocity in the main flow asymptotically. For fluids having relatively small viscosity the effect of internal friction in a fluid is appreciable only in a narrow region surrounding the fluid boundaries.

    Searching the meaning of this bold word notwithstanding, I couldn't get the meaning completely here. Would you please help me?

    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: That fluid layer which has had its velocity

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Consider the graph showing the function 1/x. The function approaches zero as x increases. It never actually gets to zero, but it gets close enough that for all practical purposes it reaches zero.

    That is what "asymptotically" means.

    In your example sentence, it is saying that the velocity of the boundary layer becomes very near to being the same as the velocity of the main flow.

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    #3

    Re: That fluid layer which has had its velocity

    Well-done. Can you give me a synonym for that?
    Your explanation was perfect.

    Thanks!

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    #4

    Re: That fluid layer which has had its velocity

    It's a technical term. There is no synonym.

    The easiest way to explain it is to draw the graph.

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