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    #1

    "Sweet are the uses of adversity"

    I just went to chapter two, Subjects and Predicates of my grammar book.
    There are 2 example sentences to explain how imperative sentences usually omit subjects, such as
    "Here comes the bus."
    "Sweet are the uses of adversity."

    However I have no idea what the second sentence even means.
    I know all the meanings of the words, but can't seem to figure the meaning out.
    Help me please?

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    #2

    Re: "Sweet are the uses of adversity"

    Neither of your sentences is in the imperative mood, examples of which are 'Go away!' and 'Bring it here!' the subject (you) being omitted.

    'Here comes the bus' is a simple statement, 'the bus' being the subject.

    'Sweet are the uses of adversity' is an inversion of 'The uses of adversity are sweet', the subject being '(The) uses (of adversity)'.

    I can't figure out the meaning, either.

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    #3

    Re: "Sweet are the uses of adversity"

    But is the sentence grammaticlally corret?

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    #4

    Re: "Sweet are the uses of adversity"

    Quote Originally Posted by anniey799 View Post
    But is the sentence grammaticlally corret?
    Yes, but a grammatically correct sentence that has no meaning is not a good thing. Context could, however, supply the missing meaning.

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