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    #1

    why the progressive form here?

    A: Where are you going to be living - on campus or in private accomodation?
    B: University accomodation. I'm in room 112 Ashley Residence, Manchester.

    I heard this progressive form from a native speaker but I cannot understan why he hasn't used the simple form "live". Could you please explain it?
    Thank you all.

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    #2

    Re: why the progressive form here?

    (neither an English teacher nor a native speaker)

    I think "be living" emphasises that it is going to be temporary - only for a realtively short period of time.

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    #3

    Re: why the progressive form here?

    You could use the simple form, but the progressive is more common. It emphasizes that the living is ongoing.

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    #4

    Re: why the progressive form here?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    You could use the simple form, but the progressive is more common. It emphasizes that the living is ongoing.
    I am sorry but I seem to mistake the meaning of the ajective "ongoing". Does it mean "continuing; still in progress"?
    If so, then I am wondering how something that has not happened yet and is only going to happen in the future can already be ongoing.
    Last edited by Weaver67; 13-Dec-2013 at 13:56.

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    #5

    Re: why the progressive form here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Weaver67 View Post
    I am sorry but I seem to mistake the meaning of the ajective "ongoing". Does it mean "continuing; still in progress"?
    If so, then I am wondering how something that has not happened yet and is only going to happen in the future can already be ongoing.
    It's future progressive. It will be ongoing in the future.

    When people speak of where they live, they tend to use simple present if the situation has not changed. I live in Pennsylvania.

    If something has recently changed or temporary, they tend to use a progressive form. I'm living in Ohio now. I'm staying in a hotel until my home renovations are done.

    This is using the future with the progressive to speak of something that will happen. I am going to be living on campus.

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    #6

    Re: why the progressive form here?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    It's future progressive. It will be ongoing in the future.

    When people speak of where they live, they tend to use simple present if the situation has not changed. I live in Pennsylvania.

    If something has recently changed or temporary, they tend to use a progressive form. I'm living in Ohio now. I'm staying in a hotel until my home renovations are done.

    This is using the future with the progressive to speak of something that will happen. I am going to be living on campus.
    Thank you Dave for taking your time. The whole thing about the present progressive and the use of "going to" does not seem anything new to me.

    However, what concerns me here is how the term "ongoing" applies to the verb "to live". Let us imagine the following:

    I live in, say, Toronto and I have always lived there. A few days ago I received a once-in-a-lifetime job offer that seemed very promising and long-term, but that requires moving up to Ottawa on a permanent basis. Of course, I should mull it over before making a decision. I have not yet make up my mind whether to accept it or not, and so, for me, the state of living in Toronto is still ongoing (again, if I understand the meaning of "ongoing" rightly), and will be ongoing until I move to that city and thus stop living in Toronto.

    In this regard, which of the following should be better (or more appropriate) to say to my close relatives if I were to accept that offer and agree to move away:
    1)"I am going to live in Ottawa";
    2)"I am going to be living in Ottawa"?

    I would go for 1, since it is not goint to be temporary. And I would only choose 2 if we were talking about, say, a business trip.

    The verb "live" is a tricky one. Let us take a look at the following example:

    3) I am going to choose option 1.

    This depicts one short action which is by no means ongoing. If we replace "choose option 1" with "live in Ottawa", we will form the sentence in which the action (or rather state), by contrast, is perceived as far more prolonged and continuing. As far as my level of English allows me to see, in both "I am going to live somewhere" and "I am going to be living somwhere" the part after "going to" suggests something that will be ongoing, not one momentary act as in example 3.

    So, if my understanding of "being ongoing" is correct, then what is the point in emphasizing something being ongoing which is by its nature already ongoing?

    P.S.
    That said, I still have the feeling that I have missed something, and so I really need your help. Thank you very much in advance.
    Last edited by Weaver67; 13-Dec-2013 at 15:03.

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    #7

    Re: why the progressive form here?

    You are basically correct that both options 1 and 2 convey the same information about future living arrangements. Like I said above, the fact that something is changing or temporary tends to make people want to use the progressive form.

    I would say "I will be living on the road until Christmas."

    I would say "I live in Pennsylvania."

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    #8

    Re: why the progressive form here?

    It's not very helpful to your understanding of the progressive, but in the context you gave about the job in Ottawa, I would simply say "I'm moving to Ottawa" rather than "I will live in Ottawa". However, I would say "I'll be living in Ottawa from next month".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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