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    #1

    the documents he is due through November

    Hello everybody again!

    These are the documents he is due through November.

    Does the above sentence mean "These are the documents which/that he is due to obtain until the end of November?

    Thank you.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: the documents he is due through November

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Hello everybody again!

    These are the documents he is due through November.

    Does the above sentence mean "These are the documents which/that he is due to obtain until the end of November?

    Thank you.
    Probably.

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    #3

    Re: the documents he is due through November

    The use of "through November" says that it is the American English.

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    #4

    Re: the documents he is due through November

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    The use of "through November" says that it is the American English.
    Yes that is evidently a BrE/AmE difference.

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    #5

    Re: the documents he is due through November

    I would read it as "the documents that someone was to give to him."

    What is the British version of "through November"?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: the documents he is due through November

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I would read it as "the documents that someone was to give to him."

    What is the British version of "through November"?
    I have been told that they do not differentiate "to November" from "through Novvember", but that may not be accurate.

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    #7

    Re: the documents he is due through November

    If "from now through February" means "from now until the beginning of February" then the latter is what we say in BrE. However, I admit I'm not sure about the meaning of "through February" in AmE. If it includes February, then in BrE we would say "from now until the end of February".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: the documents he is due through November

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If "from now through February" means "from now until the beginning of February" then the latter is what we say in BrE. However, I admit I'm not sure about the meaning of "through February" in AmE. If it includes February, then in BrE we would say "from now until the end of February".
    In AmE, from X to Y usually means from the beginning of X to the beginning of Y. From X through Y usually means from the beginning of X to the end of Y. Therefore, I will be gone from May to September is different from I will be gone from May through September. I have to admit that this is not totally consistent in AmE. A person would likely say, I work Monday to Friday to mean I work those five, not four, days. But when it comes to calender dates, the difference is more clear. I will be gone from the seventh to the thirteenth means that I will be back on the thirteenth. I will be gone from the seventh through the thirteenth means that I will be back on the fourteenth. I have no idea when or how this difference was created. I assume it was created to clarify an issue that is often misunderstood.

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    #9

    Re: the documents he is due through November

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If "from now through February" means "from now until the beginning of February" then the latter is what we say in BrE. However, I admit I'm not sure about the meaning of "through February" in AmE. If it includes February, then in BrE we would say "from now until the end of February".
    I don't see how you can say you are "through" February at the beginning of it. If we have to pass through a dangerous forest, we are not through it when we enter it.

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    #10

    Re: the documents he is due through November

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I don't see how you can say you are "through" February at the beginning of it. If we have to pass through a dangerous forest, we are not through it when we enter it.
    I thought perhaps it might mean "From now right through to February" which is used in BrE. That means until the end of January/beginning of Feb.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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