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    #1

    Ing-form

    Hi!


    The no.1 is correct, isn't it? And the no.2 wrong? I don't really understand why.

    1. Soon he will start playing.
    2. Soon he will start to play.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Ing-form

    Quote Originally Posted by ladyTL View Post
    Hi!

    The no.1 is correct, isn't it? And the no.2 wrong? I don't really understand why.

    1. Soon he will start playing.
    2. Soon he will start to play.
    Say either "number one" or "the first one" but not "the number one"

    Both are correct.

    And while "start playing" and "start to play" have the same meaning, "stop playing" and "stop to play" mean very different things.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: Ing-form

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Say either "number one" or "the first one" but not "the number one"

    Both are correct.

    And while "start playing" and "start to play" have the same meaning, "stop playing" and "stop to play" mean very different things.
    What's the difference?
    So, are "I love being here" and "I love to be here" both correct?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Ing-form

    Quote Originally Posted by ladyTL View Post
    What's the difference?
    Barb told you they both have the same meaning. There is no difference.
    So, are "I love being here" and "I love to be here" both correct?
    Yes, but the 'so' doesn't belong there. Many verbs can be followed by either the to- infinitive or the -ing form, not by both.

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    #5

    Re: Ing-form

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Barb told you they both have the same meaning. There is no difference.Yes, but the 'so' doesn't belong there. Many verbs can be followed by either the to- infinitive or the -ing form, not by both.
    ok, but are both common? Because the ing-form seems way more common.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Ing-form

    There are over 24,000 COCA citations for start to VERB and 56,000 for start VERBing,

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