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  1. salvador.dal1950's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Argentina
      • Current Location:
      • Argentina

    • Join Date: Dec 2013
    • Posts: 129
    #1

    Prospect for/of - should not lock this door

    Hello. I've two quick questions.

    When should I use "prospect for" and "prospect of".

    For example:
    • prospect for: The prospects for employment in the technology sector are especially good right now.
    • prospect of: Doctors say there is little prospect of any improvement in his condition.



    The second question.

    Under no circumstances should this door be locked.
    Under no circumstances this door should be locked.

    Looking at the solution of the exercise, I realize that the second one is wrong. Why?

    Thank you !

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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      • United States
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    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: Prospect for/of - should not lock this door

    Quote Originally Posted by salvador.dal1950 View Post
    Hello. I've two quick questions.

    When should I use "prospect for" and "prospect of".

    For example:
    • prospect for: The prospects for employment in the technology sector are especially good right now.
    • prospect of: Doctors say there is little prospect of any improvement in his condition.



    The second question.

    Under no circumstances should this door be locked.
    Under no circumstances this door should be locked.

    Looking at the solution of the exercise, I realize that the second one is wrong. Why?

    Thank you !
    I don't think I can answer your first question. In many cases, either preposition could be used. Your second sentence, for example could also be "little prospect for". Preposition choice is often idiomatic.

    In your second question, when a negative adverbial phrase begins a sentence, we invert the subject and verb. Why? I haven't a clue.

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