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    #1

    Her grades have improves

    Her grades have improves, but only ........ .

    1. in a small amount
    2. very slightly
    3. minimum
    4. some

    What's wrong with No.1? (answer key: No.2)

  1. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Her grades have improves

    Her grades have improved, not improves. "In a small amount" is unnatural. The phrase is "by a small amount."

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    #3

    Re: Her grades have improves

    What's wrong with using "some" ? Does it make the sentence incomplete?

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    #4

    Re: Her grades have improves

    Quote Originally Posted by Freeguy View Post
    What's wrong with using "some" ? Does it make the sentence incomplete?
    It's unnatural.

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    #5

    Re: Her grades have improves

    Quote Originally Posted by Freeguy View Post
    What's wrong with using "some" ? Does it make the sentence incomplete?
    If you mean "Some of her grades have improved", say that. You will sometimes hear 'some' used to mean "a bit". "He's grown some since I saw him last." I believe this occurs in some AmE dialects. Even so, it's wrong in the original.

  4. probus's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Her grades have improves

    "He's grown some" is correct and natural in AmE, but to me it is it also rustic and antiquated. It is like the dialogue of a cowboy movie, not something anybody would say today.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Her grades have improves

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    "He's grown some" is correct and natural in AmE, but to me it is it also rustic and antiquated. It is like the dialogue of a cowboy movie, not something anybody would say today.
    I don't see anything wrong with it. https://books.google.com/ngrams/grap...%20bit%3B%2Cc0

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    #8

    Re: Her grades have improves

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I don't see anything wrong with it. https://books.google.com/ngrams/grap...%20bit%3B%2Cc0
    Thank you for the link, MikeNewYork.

    Does the graph show how frequently the particular word or phrase is used in books, and not in everyday conversation?

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    #9

    Re: Her grades have improves

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Thank you for the link, MikeNewYork.

    Does the graph show how frequently the particular word or phrase is used in books, and not in everyday conversation?
    Probably, yes. But it shows what actually occurs in English.

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