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Thread: "I was like"

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    #1

    "I was like"

    Hi,

    Is saying "I was like...", "He was like...." and etc instead of "I said", "He said" a typical American thing or are they universal in all English-spoken countries?
    It seems to me that teenagers and youngsters use that more often, am I right?


    Thank you
    Last edited by LeTyan; 23-Dec-2013 at 05:00.

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    #2

    Re: "I was like"

    Quote Originally Posted by LeTyan View Post
    Hi,

    Is saying "I was like...", "He was like...." and etc instead of "I said", "He said" a typical American thing or are they universal in all English-spoken countries?
    It seems to me that teenagers and youngsters use that more often, am I right?


    Thank you
    Unfortunately, it is common in the US.

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    #3

    Re: "I was like"

    It's common in the UK, too.

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    #4

    Re: "I was like"

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    It's common in the UK, too.

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    #5

    Re: "I was like"

    not a teacher

    It's like really common here, too.

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    #6

    Re: "I was like"

    In the US, we use it to introduce both what was said (actual or paraphrased) and what was felt. Is it the same in the UK?

    And I was all like "Oh no you don't" and managed to say calmly "I don't think you should do that" but inside I was all like "I'm gonna kick his a** if he does that!"

    And he was like all pissed off about it! And I'm like, where does he get off being mad when he's the one who acted like a jerk? So I'm like "Look, you've gone out with your friends every Friday for the last month, so you have no business getting all up in arms when I say that next Sunday I'm going out with the girls."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: "I was like"

    When I'm reading such examples I'm starting to figure out that my English is not prepared to live in the US.
    By the way, we have the same contruction in Russian. A lot of people, who have a limited vocabulary, use it.


    After ten minutes of struggling with Barb_D's message I got the meaning!
    Last edited by Boris Tatarenko; 23-Dec-2013 at 15:46. Reason: got it.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

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    #8

    Re: "I was like"

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Tatarenko View Post
    When I'm reading such examples I'm starting to figure out that my English is not prepared (I'd say "not good enough", but probably, the following "to live..." doesn't work.) to live in the US.
    By the way, we have the same construction in Russian. A lot of people, who have a limited vocabulary, use it. (I'd delete the commas.)


    After ten minutes of struggling with Barb_D's message I got the meaning!
    Hello.
    Like you, Boris, I sometimes find it difficult to follow when native speakers say things like Barb's example. (I know it's natural English, though.)
    The speaker in Barb's example is obviously not in his/her usual calm state of mind. Thus he/she, I imagine, might be speaking faster than usual, which makes it more difficlut for non-native speakers to follow.
    Last edited by tzfujimino; 23-Dec-2013 at 17:33.

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    #9

    Re: "I was like"

    That's very perceptive to realize it's often used when we are upset. Or at least surprised. I'm sorry to say it's very typical usage.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #10

    Re: "I was like"

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Tatarenko View Post
    When I'm reading such examples I'm starting to figure out that my English is not prepared to live in the US.
    By the way, we have the same contruction in Russian. A lot of people, who have a limited vocabulary, use it.


    After ten minutes of struggling with Barb_D's message I got the meaning!
    Not all Americans speak that way. I don't and I doubt that Barb does.

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