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  1. Yiagos
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    #1

    Short form is mandatory in speaking?

    When we write or posting on forums, it is a good idea to avoid short forms. For example, it is preferred I am going to cinema because I could not work instead of I'm going to cinema because I couldn't work
    My question is if it is wrong to speak in long form. Can I speak Peter you are my best friend or we must say Peter you're my best friend
    I am asking because in some cases it is a bit hard to speak in short form because these abbreviations are full of constant letters, which are not common in my native language.
    Last edited by Yiagos; 24-Dec-2013 at 16:37.

  2. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Short form is mandatory in speaking?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yiagos View Post
    My question is if it is wrong to speak in long form.
    It is not.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Short form is mandatory in speaking?

    Both the shortened form and the full long form are correct. You would, however, sound more natural if you used the shortened forms but only if you can pronounce them correctly. If they are very difficult for you, stick to the long forms.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Short form is mandatory in speaking?

    On this forum, these contractions are OK, but text and chatroom forms are frowned upon.
    Last edited by Tdol; 26-Dec-2013 at 16:16. Reason: Added- these

  4. Yiagos
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    #5

    Exactly!

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    but only if you can pronounce them correctly. If they are very difficult for you, stick to the long forms.
    That was the reason why I asked. In Greek all letter are pronounced in same way. No differences!
    For example, it is easier to pronounce I will not than I won't
    Alas, I can imagine myself trying to prounounce I won't want it is impossible!

  5. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Exactly!

    Quote Originally Posted by Yiagos View Post
    That was the reason why I asked. In Greek all letter are pronounced in same way. No differences!
    For example, it is easier to pronounce I will not than I won't
    Alas, I can imagine myself trying to prounounce I won't want. It is impossible!
    Why not practice? E.g. Won't we warn Wolsey Woden won't want one?
    Last edited by englishhobby; 26-Dec-2013 at 08:28.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  6. Yiagos
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    #7
    Any revision process requires time. Since I encounter other significant problems (grammar, vocabulary) I prefer the long forms
    In the future I'll try again!

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    #8

    Re: Short form is mandatory in speaking?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yiagos View Post
    Any revision process requires time. Since I encounter other significant problems (grammar, vocabulary) I prefer the long forms
    In the future I'll try again!
    Believe you me, of the three, pronunciation is the easiest thing to master. It doesn't normally take much time and in most cases it's just a matter of one-time effort but it's amazinly rewarding.

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