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    #1

    Use of the verb be

    Hello,
    I have two sentences:

    1. Her seat number is sixty-four.
    2. Your seat is number seventy-three.

    In the first sentence the verb 'be' is after the word "number". In the second sentence the verb 'be' is before the word "number". Why is this?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Use of the verb be

    Quote Originally Posted by zoltankr View Post
    Hello,
    I have two sentences:

    1. Her seat number is sixty-four.
    2. Your seat is number seventy-three.

    In the first sentence the verb 'be' is after the word "number". In the second sentence the verb 'be' is before the word "number". Why is this?
    They are just different ways of conveying the same information. One of the best parts of English is the diversity of the language.

  2. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Use of the verb be

    Quote Originally Posted by zoltankr View Post
    Hello,
    I have two sentences:

    1. Her seat number is sixty-four.
    2. Your seat is number seventy-three.

    In the first sentence the verb 'be' is after the word "number". In the second sentence the verb 'be' is before the word "number". Why is this?
    These are two ways of saying the same (you'd better use the same number to make this fact more distinct). In the first one the subject is number (seat serving as an attribute), while sixty-four is part of the predicate. In the second sentence the subject is seat and number seventy-three is part of the predicate.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

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