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  1. Newbie
    Interested in Language
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      • Native Language:
      • Malayalam
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Dec 2013
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    Doubt in Sentence formation in Spoken English

    I have seen people (including me) using the word sounding like "Know" or "No" at the end of line like the following to ascertain something:


    1. I am correct know? or I am correct no?
    2. I can call you know? or I can call you no?
    3. You are okay know? or you are okay no?


    Not sure if any of this is correct or at least one is!

    I would like to know if this is correct at least in spoken english?

    Cheers!
    Last edited by Bads007; 30-Dec-2013 at 15:57. Reason: correction

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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      • American English
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      • United States
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      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #2

    Re: Doubt in Sentence formation in Spoken English

    Welcome to Using English!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bads007 View Post
    I have seen people (including me) using the word sounding like "Know" or "No" at the end of line like the following to ascertain something:


    1. I am correct know? or I am correct no?
    2. I can call you know? or I can call you no?
    3. You are okay know? or you are okay no?


    Not sure if any of this is correct or at least one is!

    I would like to know if this is correct at least in spoken english?

    Cheers!
    With your #1 above, adding "no" to the end of the a sentence as a "tag" seems to happen with people whose native language is Spanish or related languages. The "native" English way to say that would be either "right?" or with a full tag: I'm correct, aren't I? This is correct, right? I am right about this, am I not?

    With your #2 above, I'm not sure if it's supposed to be a tag, as above, or the word "now." Is this a good time to call? Can I call you now? (Something that would be went in a text message, perhaps.)

    #3 seems to be "now." You weren't okay before. I want to see if you are okay now. Are you okay now? I heard you were really ill over the holiday. Are you okay now?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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      • Russian Federation
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      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: May 2013
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    #3

    Re: Doubt in Sentence formation in Spoken English

    Hello.

    I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker.
    Probably, you heard this phrase: "you know". As far as I know native speakers (specially people who doesn't pay attention what they say) can say "you know" "I mean" "like" and etc. without any meaning, just for sound.

    Unfortunately, I'm not able to show you a good example.

    I'm not sure it's that thing that you're looking for.

    Boris.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

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