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  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #1

    "for his to be reviewed"

    "At the rate the clerks were processing the applications, Harry figured that it will take four hours for his to be reviewed."


    The answer key states that will take should be would take. My question is does his in for his to be reviewed refer to Harry's applications, please? I think it (his) does refer to Harry's applications. Therefore, his here functions as replacive. Thanks.


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    #2

    Re: "for his to be reviewed"

    'his' means 'his application' (not 'applications').

    I don't know what you mean by 'replacive'. Dictionaries do not list that word.

  2. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "for his to be reviewed"

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    I don't know what you mean by 'replacive'.
    Honestly, one of my teachers at school rejected labeling it possessive pronoun. He said, "You, Abdullah, should say replacive." I couldn’t confront someone studied many years in American schools and holding Ph.D. Thank you, Rover.


  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "for his to be reviewed"

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    Honestly, one of my teachers at school rejected labeling it possessive pronoun. He said, "You, Abdullah, should say replacive." I couldn’t confront someone studied many years in American schools and holding Ph.D. Thank you, Rover.

    I had to Google it and here is just one of the hits: replacive - definition and examples of replacives in English
    I had never heard of it until today.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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