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  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #1

    "donut, at doughnut"


  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "donut, at doughnut"

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    Why do we have at before doughnut?
    It says "for" not "at". In the US the word is spelled both ways.

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    #3

    Re: "donut, at doughnut"

    not a teacher

    It says "donut, at doughnut" on the "See all results" page because it's directing you to where the form "donut" is defined on the "doughnut" page.
    In other words: ""donut" is defined at the entry for "doughnut".

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    #4

    Re: "donut, at doughnut"

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    In the US the word is spelled both ways.
    Donut is crossing over a bit into BrE- it's less of a spelling mouthful.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "donut, at doughnut"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Donut is crossing over a bit into BrE- it's less of a spelling mouthful.
    I think we can thank/blame "Dunkin' Donuts" for that. I suppose we should be grateful that, for now, they continue to put the apostrophe at the end of "Dunkin' ".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "donut, at doughnut"

    And that they don't sell "Donut's"
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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