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  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #1

    "donut, at doughnut"


  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "donut, at doughnut"

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    Why do we have at before doughnut?
    It says "for" not "at". In the US the word is spelled both ways.

  3. Key Member
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    #3

    Re: "donut, at doughnut"

    not a teacher

    It says "donut, at doughnut" on the "See all results" page because it's directing you to where the form "donut" is defined on the "doughnut" page.
    In other words: ""donut" is defined at the entry for "doughnut".

  4. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #4

    Re: "donut, at doughnut"

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    In the US the word is spelled both ways.
    Donut is crossing over a bit into BrE- it's less of a spelling mouthful.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "donut, at doughnut"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Donut is crossing over a bit into BrE- it's less of a spelling mouthful.
    I think we can thank/blame "Dunkin' Donuts" for that. I suppose we should be grateful that, for now, they continue to put the apostrophe at the end of "Dunkin' ".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "donut, at doughnut"

    And that they don't sell "Donut's"
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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