Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: nitpick

  1. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 425
    #1

    nitpick

    With what prepositions can "nitpick" be used as a verb?

    1) He likes to nitpick at me.
    2) He likes to nitpick on me.
    3) He likes to nitpick me.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 26,076
    #2

    Re: nitpick

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    With what prepositions can "nitpick" be used as a verb?

    1) He likes to nitpick at me.
    2) He likes to nitpick on me.
    3) He likes to nitpick me.
    What are you trying to say with "nitpick"?

  3. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 425
    #3

    Re: nitpick

    to criticize by focusing on inconsequential details.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
    Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 26,076
    #4

    Re: nitpick

    They are all unnatural. You could say "He nitpicks all the time".

  5. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 425
    #5

    Re: nitpick

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    They are all unnatural. You could say "He nitpicks all the time".
    What if a speaker needs to mention the addressee of the nitpicking how the speaker is supposed to do that? He nitpicks all the time. doesn't mention it.

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
    Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 26,076
    #6

    Re: nitpick

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    What if a speaker needs to mention the addressee of the nitpicking how the speaker is supposed to do that? He nitpicks all the time. doesn't mention it.
    "He nitpicks about everything I say."

  7. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,455
    #7

    Re: nitpick

    I don't have a problem with "he nitpicks me."

  8. Barb_D's Avatar
    Moderator
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,269
    #8

    Re: nitpick

    For me, it's more natural to use a direct object, but not a person as that object.

    He nitpicks everything I say.
    He nitpicks everything I write.

    This is likely one of those words that gets used differently and since it's a rather informal word, I couldn't say that I find either bhai's use or Dave's use "wrong."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  9. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,982
    #9

    Re: nitpick

    I am more familiar with the intransitive use "nitpick". I would go with bhai's use.

  10. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 60,639
    #10

    Re: nitpick

    I'd mostly use it intransitively or like Barb, though He nitpicks me makes perfect sense. Maybe it's time to start using it.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •