Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Sep 2013
    • Posts: 22
    #1

    lose an inch off your waist

    Hello, I couldn't understand what the "off" means in the title. To me, it makes sense when writing "from" instead of "off". However, I can't find any information that shows me from and off have close meanings sometimes. I need some help to make it clear, thanks in advance.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #2

    Re: lose an inch off your waist

    You put inches on and take them off. Same with "weight" or "pounds."

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,623
    #3

    Re: lose an inch off your waist

    You could also use "from". It's far more common, as Dave suggested, to use "off", though.

Similar Threads

  1. Bend at the waist
    By Viktor Sorokin in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-May-2013, 18:28
  2. [General] "The waist measurement" vs. "The waist measuring"
    By hellom1234 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 20-May-2012, 15:38
  3. turning the waist first?
    By Tack in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-Dec-2011, 15:16
  4. Does 'the meddle' mean waist?
    By yuyu0615 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 17-Feb-2011, 14:03
  5. an inch
    By user_gary in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-Feb-2007, 08:26

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •