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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    Could 'fall off' mean the same as 'give in'?

    Hi,

    Here's the context in which someone's trying to advise another person about her problems with parents:

    'Back into a wall as hard as you can, enough to make them uncomfortable or very slightly hurt. then they'll probably fall off!

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Could 'fall off' mean the same as 'give in'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi,

    Here's the context in which someone's trying to advise another person about her problems with parents:

    'Back into a wall as hard as you can, enough to make them uncomfortable or very slightly hurt. then they'll probably fall off!
    That expression doesn't work for me. Perhaps you want "back off".

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Could 'fall off' mean the same as 'give in'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi,

    Here's the context in which someone's trying to advise another person about her problems with parents:

    'Back into a wall as hard as you can, enough to make them uncomfortable or very slightly hurt. then they'll probably fall off!
    I don't understand the logic here. If you tell the person to "back into a wall as hard as you can" then it is the person doing the backing who will be uncomfortable or slightly hurt. How will their backing into a wall hurt their parents? The only way I can see this working is if the person is driving a car and his/her parents are passengers. When the car backs into a wall, all the people in the car might be hurt in some way. However, I fail to see how crashing a car will make someone's parents back off. I think we need a lot more context to work out what on earth this advice might mean.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Could 'fall off' mean the same as 'give in'?

    You could back them up against the wall, meaning to put them in a position where they find it difficult to argue their case. As it stands, the original sentence doesn't work for me either.

  4. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Could 'fall off' mean the same as 'give in'?

    Thanks to all. Here's the page where I came across this comment:

    How to get parents off my back? - Yahoo Answers

    The 3rd one, by Jeff.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Could 'fall off' mean the same as 'give in'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Thanks to all. Here's the page where I came across this comment:

    How to get parents off my back? - Yahoo Answers

    The 3rd one, by Jeff.
    It seems that the phrase "fall off" derives from the question. The parents are obviously on her back, and the respondent advises how they might fall off. It's not idiomatic English. It's an attempt at humour, I'd guess.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Could 'fall off' mean the same as 'give in'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    It seems that the phrase "fall off" derives from the question. The parents are obviously on her back, and the respondent advises how they might fall off. It's not idiomatic English. It's an attempt at humour, I'd guess.
    Yes. The respondent has taken the phrase "my parents are on my back" entirely literally and then tried to make a funny suggestion about how to literally make them fall off her back. The attempt fails. It would never have occurred to me that that was what was meant without seeing the link. In all honesty, I wouldn't rely on Yahoo Answers for examples of good English. Looking at the various answers given to that question, it's clear that the respondents are either incapable of, or not interested in, writing good English.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Could 'fall off' mean the same as 'give in'?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Yes. The respondent has taken the phrase "my parents are on my back" entirely literally and then tried to make a funny suggestion about how to literally make them fall off her back. The attempt fails. It would never have occurred to me that that was what was meant without seeing the link. In all honesty, I wouldn't rely on Yahoo Answers for examples of good English. Looking at the various answers given to that question, it's clear that the respondents are either incapable of, or not interested in, writing good English.
    Thank you for the comment. The problem is, in real life situations we, mostly, come across those native speakers who wouldn't really stick to what we call 'grammatical'. And, they'd rely on the hidden context they share with each other. So, it's almost IMPOSSIBLE for a non-native speaker to figure out how the language works at times! :(

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    #9

    Re: Could 'fall off' mean the same as 'give in'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Thank you for the comment. The problem is, in real life situations we, mostly, come across those native speakers who wouldn't really stick to what we call 'grammatical'. And, they'd rely on the hidden context they share with each other. So, it's almost IMPOSSIBLE for a non-native speaker to figure out how the language works at times! :(
    Without the context of the Yahoo page, I didn't realise that it was a joke- I just thought it was badly written. Mind you, it's not much better in context.

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