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  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #1

    Nice plan or Fine plan

    I have already asked about the difference between nice and fine in this forum (that time it was about its use with "tea" and "knife"). Now the same about "plans" and "bikes" - if I like someone's plan or bike, should I use "fine" or "nice" to describe it (if I only have to choose between the two words), and, if both are possible, is there a difference?

    1) I like his plan. It is fine. (I like his bike. It is fine.)
    2) I like his plan. It is nice. (I like his bike. It is nice.)

    To me it seems that a woman would use "nice" (= lovely, pleasant to look at) and a man would say "fine" (= reasonable, good quality). Am I right?
    Last edited by englishhobby; 22-Jan-2014 at 11:12.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Nice plan or Fine plan

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    I have already asked about the difference between nice and fine in this forum (that time it was about its use with "tea" and "knife"). Now the same about "plans" and "bikes" - if I like someone's plan or bike, should I use "fine" or "nice" to describe it (if I only have to choose between the two words), and, if both are possible, is there a difference?

    1) I like his plan. It is fine. (I like his bike. It is fine.)
    2) I like his plan. It is nice. (I like his bike. It is nice.)

    To me it seems that a woman would use "nice" (= lovely, pleasant to look at) and a man would say "fine" (= reasonable, good quality). Am I right?
    Not necessarily. This is not a gender issue.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Nice plan or Fine plan

    We rarely use "fine" in that sort of context. It's used frequently to mean acceptable, adequate or OK.

    Did you check my homework?
    Yes. It's fine. (It's OK. There aren't too many mistakes. It doesn't mean that it's perfect or lovely or beautiful.)

    Have you checked on the baby?
    Yes, she's fine. (She's OK. She's not ill and she seems happy.)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Nice plan or Fine plan

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Not necessarily. This is not a gender issue.
    And is there a difference in meaning between 1) and 2)? Which sentences are more natural?
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Nice plan or Fine plan

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    And is there a difference in meaning between 1) and 2)? Which sentences are more natural?
    Not much. I doubt I would say a bicycle is "fine".

  6. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Nice plan or Fine plan

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    We rarely use "fine" in that sort of context. It's used frequently to mean acceptable, adequate or OK.

    Did you check my homework?
    Yes. It's fine. (It's OK. There aren't too many mistakes. It doesn't mean that it's perfect or lovely or beautiful.)

    Have you checked on the baby?
    Yes, she's fine. (She's OK. She's not ill and she seems happy.)
    And what about "a fine /nice plan"?)) Is it better to use "a nice plan" then? Does this sentence make sense? I need these sentences to make simple exercises for elementary students who have just learnt "fine" and "nice"and the verb to be in the present tense. I just want the sentences to make sense so that I could use them to practice elementary grammar and vocabulary.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Nice plan or Fine plan

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    And what about "a fine /nice plan"?)) Is it better to use "a nice plan" then? Does this sentence make sense? I need these sentences to make simple exercises for elementary students who have just learnt "fine" and "nice"and the verb to be in the present tense. I just want the sentences to make sense so that I could use them to practice elementary grammar and vocabulary.
    With "plan", I would use either.

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