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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Pashto, Pushto
      • Home Country:
      • Afghanistan
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      • Afghanistan

    • Join Date: Jan 2014
    • Posts: 8
    #1

    Question tooth-propitiation

    Hi
    I have problem with the meaning of this part of sentence:
    "However that may be, at the tooth-propitiation I had no feeling at all of peace and inner bliss."

    "However that may be, at the tooth-propitiation I had no feeling at all of peace and inner bliss.
    To the contrary, I realized that if I was a Tamil I would have a very good chance of being dismembered."

    It doesn't appear in any dictionary, please help.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
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      • American English
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      • United States
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      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #2

    Re: tooth-propitiation

    It can be found in the dictionary: Propitiation - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

    However, I have absolutely no idea what the sentence is supposed to mean!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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      • British English
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      • UK
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      • UK

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    • Posts: 41,876
    #3

    Re: tooth-propitiation

    I believe that being in the presence of a supposed relic from a supposed god, people are supposed to feel peaceful and blissful. With the "tooth" example, I assume it refers to something like the "tooth of Buddha" which is held in Kandy, Sri Lanka (I have been there and seen this relic).

    In the piece quoted, it sounds as if the writer was actually present at the sacrifice/removal (?) of a god's tooth but that they did not experience the expected feeling of bliss and peace.

    It really isn't very clear.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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