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  1. vaibhavmaskar
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    #1

    absolute phrase

    The season nearly finished,Rebecca Lobo and Sophie Witherspoon emerged as true leaders

    " The season nearly finished" is an absolute phrase but It look like simple past tense.

    How absolute phrase different from simpale past(grammar and meaning)?

    Thanks

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: absolute phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by vaibhavmaskar View Post
    The season nearly finished,Rebecca Lobo and Sophie Witherspoon emerged as true leaders

    " The season nearly finished" is an absolute phrase but It look like simple past tense.

    How absolute phrase different from simpale past(grammar and meaning)?

    Thanks
    That is not the simple past tense. The word "finished" is a past participle there that acts as a modifier of the noun "season".

  3. vaibhavmaskar
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    #3

    Re: absolute phrase

    1.The season nearly finished- absolute phras.

    2.The class (nearly) finished- simple past.

    I think same grammar, so how they make difference?

  4. vaibhavmaskar
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    #4

    Re: absolute phrase

    -
    Last edited by vaibhavmaskar; 27-Jan-2014 at 03:41.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: absolute phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by vaibhavmaskar View Post
    1.The season nearly finished- absolute phras.

    2.The class (nearly) finished- simple past.

    I think same grammar, so how they make difference?
    The complete sentence makes the difference. You cannot analyze words in a vacuum.

  6. vaibhavmaskar
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    #6

    Re: absolute phrase

    Could you explain in details?

  7. Bennevis's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: absolute phrase

    Let me try.

    The season BEING nearly finished, Rebecca Lobo and Sophie Witherspoon emerged as true leaders.

    Does this make sense?

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: absolute phrase

    Well, yes, that's what it means but the original is fine.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: absolute phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by vaibhavmaskar View Post
    Could you explain in details?
    I believe the construction you used is called (by some at least) a gerundive (Gerundive - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
    Last edited by charliedeut; 27-Jan-2014 at 11:18. Reason: Missed a verb!
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  10. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: absolute phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    I believe the construction you used is called (by some at least) a gerundive (Gerundive - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
    Yes, that is true. But learners already have trouble differentiating gerunds from (present) participles. The term "gerundive" makes that worse, IMO.

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