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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Is machree understood by most English Speakers

    Hi,

    I am listening a song in English titled Mother Machree. I found machree is an Irish word, which means my dear.

    I wonder whether or not "machree" is understood by most native speakers of English?


    Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: Is machree understood by most English Speakers

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post

    I am listening to a song in English called "Mother Machree". I found out that "machree" is an Irish word, which means "my dear".

    I wonder whether or not "machree" is understood by most native speakers of English?
    I've known that song for 70 years without realising that! I can't speak for 'most English speakers', though.

    I always thought it was her name.

    Please note my amendments to your post.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Is machree understood by most English Speakers

    I've never heard of the song and I've never heard of the word. I would not understand it if I heard it (well, I suppose I would understand it now because you've told me what it means!)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Is machree understood by most English Speakers

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi,

    I am listening a song in English titled Mother Machree. I found machree is an Irish word, which means my dear.

    I wonder whether or not "machree" is understood by most native speakers of English?


    Thank you!
    I have known this song for many years and learned the meaning of the word along the way. I suspect, though, that most people think that it is her last name.

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Is machree understood by most English Speakers

    I've never heard the word either. I would venture to say most native English speakers haven't either, since there are now a few of us here.

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    #6

    Re: Is machree understood by most English Speakers

    I expect the reason I and others thought it was her name is that it's capitalised not only in the title (which is only to be expected), but also in the chorus.

    (Also here.)

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Is machree understood by most English Speakers

    It's "mo chroí" in irish Gaelic. It means "my heart", "my love", "my dear".

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Is machree understood by most English Speakers

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    It's "mo chroí" in irish Gaelic. It means "my heart", "my love", "my dear".
    Is it written "Machree" phonetically or is that an error? I'm trying to imagine what would have happened if "Mother Mo Chroi" had been the title.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Is machree understood by most English Speakers

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Is it written "Machree" phonetically or is that an error? I'm trying to imagine what would have happened if "Mother Mo Chroi" had been the title.
    Unfortunately I don't do phonetic symbols, which makes it difficult to explain. "chroí" (note the accent over the "i") is pronounced "kree" but with a softish "k". The "o" in "mo" is indistinct and could be heard as "a". This is true for the dialect of Irish with which I am familiar, Galway/Mayo. There are regional differences in the Irish language.

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    #10

    Re: Is machree understood by most English Speakers

    This makes me wonder if there is some hidden meaning to "Me and Bobby McGee."

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