Results 1 to 2 of 2
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 91
    #1

    Subject of Participles

    I have a question about participles. Are the below two sentences grammatically correct?

    "By increasing the price of cars, people will need to spend more on cars, causing some to prefer to use the public transport instead."

    "Young people will receive a break from their routine school life, allowing them to relax"

    Is there a rule that somehow states that the SUBJECT of "causing" and "allowing" takes the SUBJECT of the previous clause. If so, then it wouldn't be correct as it would read like

    "By increasing the price of cars, people will need to spend more on cars, (people) causing some to prefer to use the public transport instead."

    "Young people will receive a break from their routine school life, (young people) allowing them to relax"

    "People" don't cause some to prefer to use the public transport instead. Nor do "young people" allow them to relax.

    Or can the SUBJECT of "causing" and "allowing" be a "this" (the idea of the previous clause)? Thus the sentences would be OK as it would read something like

    "By increasing the price of cars, people will need to spend more on cars, (this) causing some to prefer to use the public transport instead." (this causes)

    "Young people will receive a break from their routine school life, (this) allowing them to relax" (this allows)

    Thanks for your help.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: Subject of Participles

    Quote Originally Posted by englishteacher79 View Post
    I have a question about participles. Are the below two sentences grammatically correct?

    "By increasing the price of cars, people will need to spend more on cars, causing some to prefer to use the public transport instead."

    "Young people will receive a break from their routine school life, allowing them to relax"

    Is there a rule that somehow states that the SUBJECT of "causing" and "allowing" takes the SUBJECT of the previous clause. If so, then it wouldn't be correct as it would read like

    "By increasing the price of cars, people will need to spend more on cars, (people) causing some to prefer to use the public transport instead."

    "Young people will receive a break from their routine school life, (young people) allowing them to relax"

    "People" don't cause some to prefer to use the public transport instead. Nor do "young people" allow them to relax.

    Or can the SUBJECT of "causing" and "allowing" be a "this" (the idea of the previous clause)? Thus the sentences would be OK as it would read something like

    "By increasing the price of cars, people will need to spend more on cars, (this) causing some to prefer to use the public transport instead." (this causes)

    "Young people will receive a break from their routine school life, (this) allowing them to relax" (this allows)

    Thanks for your help.
    Participles act as modifiers. They are not real verbs. They cannot take subjects.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 22-Feb-2012, 15:21
  2. How many participles ?
    By Suthipong in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Oct-2010, 09:47
  3. [Grammar] what are the participles
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Mar-2010, 15:56
  4. [Grammar] participles
    By CollinMoore777 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Aug-2008, 18:48
  5. participles again
    By navi tasan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-May-2006, 02:39

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •