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    #1

    in driving rain

    If the wind, rain, or snow drives in a particular direction, it moves with great force in that direction.
    He crashed into a tree in driving rain.
    Colins Cobuild

    Does the preposition 'in' mean "while rain drove"?
    (or "during")
    Last edited by Vik-Nik-Sor; 09-Feb-2014 at 22:06.


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    #2

    Re: in driving rain

    Quote Originally Posted by Vik-Nik-Sor View Post
    If the wind, rain, or snow drives in a particular direction, it moves with great force in that direction.
    He crashed into a tree in driving rain.
    Colins Cobuild

    Does the preposition 'in' mean "while rain drove"?
    (or "during")
    No. A better way to write this is "...in a driving rain." A driving rain is a large amount of rain coming down at the same time. For example, a tropical storm is usually accompanied by a driving rain.

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    #3

    Re: in driving rain

    Yes, "at the same time" is what I meant. I just wanted to make sure that in driving rain is an adverbial phrase of time.


  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: in driving rain

    It is not an adverb of time. It tells you what the conditions were like while he was driving.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: in driving rain

    In BrE, we would say "in driving rain", not "in a driving rain". We don't use "rain" countably. You can count raindrops and rainstorms but not rain.

    He crashed in driving rain.
    He crashed in driving snow.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: in driving rain

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In BrE, we would say "in driving rain", not "in a driving rain". We don't use "rain" countably. You can count raindrops and rainstorms but not rain.

    He crashed in driving rain.
    He crashed in driving snow.
    In AmE, we would more often use "a".

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