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    #1

    so much the greater is the triumph of faith in nevertheless believing

    Hi, everyone,

    Please help me, I can't take the meaning of "so much the greater is the triumph of faith in nevertheless believing"

    It comes from google books ,History of Western Philosophy: Collectors Edition.
    Thanks a lot in advance.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: so much the greater is the triumph of faith in nevertheless believing

    Is that the entire sentence? If not, please post the whole thing. At the moment, it makes no sense to me.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: so much the greater is the triumph of faith in nevertheless believing

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Is that the entire sentence? If not, please post the whole thing. At the moment, it makes no sense to me.
    ُ
    "This doctrine had been preached by certain Averroists in the thirteenth century, but had been condemned by the Church. The "triumph of faith" was, for the orthodox, a dangerous device. Bayle, in the late seventeenth century, made ironical use of it, setting forth at great length all that reason could say against some orthodox belief, and then concluding "so much the greater is the triumph of faith in nevertheless believing." How far Bacon's orthodoxy was sincere it is impossible to know."

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: so much the greater is the triumph of faith in nevertheless believing

    Quote Originally Posted by kissminded View Post
    ُ
    "This doctrine had been preached by certain Averroists in the thirteenth century, but had been condemned by the Church. The "triumph of faith" was, for the orthodox, a dangerous device. Bayle, in the late seventeenth century, made ironical use of it, setting forth at great length all that reason could say against some orthodox belief, and then concluding "so much the greater is the triumph of faith in nevertheless believing." How far Bacon's orthodoxy was sincere it is impossible to know."
    Do you understand the rest of the passage?

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    #5

    Re: so much the greater is the triumph of faith in nevertheless believing

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Do you understand the rest of the passage?
    Yes, I think so.
    Well some problem is there of course,I don't know anything about "triumph of faith" but looking.

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    #6

    Re: so much the greater is the triumph of faith in nevertheless believing

    Any suggestion?

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: so much the greater is the triumph of faith in nevertheless believing

    Quote Originally Posted by kissminded View Post
    Any suggestion?
    What that phrase is trying to say is that it it easy to believe something when you have the facts: you can see it, hear it, taste it, feel it, etc. When you have no facts and still believe something, it requires faith. Some would call that the triumph of faith. Others would call that gullibility. Belief in God is probably the best example.

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