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    #1

    Confused: I'm not a teacher

    I wonder about this, please help.

    I jumped over a fence three times.

    Q1. What is the verb in the previous sentence?

    I have jumped over a fence three times.

    Q2. What is the verb in the previous sentence?

    Q3. What is the difference between tense and aspect?

    I would appreciate an answer from a teacher rather than a moderator. I do not mean to be rude, but I would like to hear from someone who is in a classroom. Although I am currently not a teacher, this question has been asked a few times in the past. I asked someone the question, and they told me something odd, so I'd like a current teacher to explain it to me. In addition, please just answer the three questions. Please use the private messaging service for comments not related to the questions.

    Thank you so much!

    B
    Last edited by Brad D; 10-Feb-2014 at 19:46.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Confused: I'm not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Brad D View Post
    I jumped over a fence three times.
    What is the verb in the previous sentence?
    You underlined it.
    I have jumped over a fence three times.

    What is the verb in the previous sentence?
    You underlined the past participle of the lexixal verb JUMP. This, with the auxiliary verb HAVE. forms the present perfect of JUMP.
    Could a mature teacher who is currently teaching (not a moderator) please explain the difference between tense and aspect?
    Please don't make that sort of request, Brad. Any member who has the knowledge is free to respond to any question.

    Modern grammarians tend to use the word tense for those forms of the verb which, by the presence or absence of inflection, locate a situation in time. For these grammarians, English has only two tenses, the uninflected/unmarked form, usually known as the present and the marked/inflected form usually known as the past. When not combined with any aspect, the tenses are usually known as the present simple and the past simple.

    The word aspect is often used for verb forms that refer to some way of looking at the situation in time, such as its duration or completion. The two aspects generally recognised in English are the perfect, formed with the auxiliary HAVE and the third form (past participle) of the verb, and the progressive (or continuous), formed with the auxiliary BE and the -ing form of the verb. The auxiliaries show tenses; we thus have the present and past perfectand present and past progressive aspects. The aspects can combine, giving us the present and past perfect progressive aspects.

    Some people refer to all the aspects as tenses. This is not really a problem for learners.
    Last edited by 5jj; 10-Feb-2014 at 20:12.

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    #3

    Re: Confused: I'm not a teacher

    5jj,

    Thank you for the detailed answer. That's what I thought about the tense and aspect. However, not to be cute, but I'm confused about the participle.

    1. I Jumped over a fence three times.
    2. I have jumped over a fence three times.

    The verb is "jumped?" The participle is "jumped?" I'm confused why in sentence one, "jumped" is not called a participle.

    3. I eat pizza everyday.
    4. I ate pizza yesterday.
    5. I have eaten pizza everyday for three years.

    The verb is "eat?" The participle is "ate?" The participle is "eaten?" It seems that some verbs add something to them to indicate tense; however, others change form to indicate tense. In addition, some verbs do the same to indicate aspect. The ability to make sure is to see the addition of the aspect marker to the left of the verb like have or be. It has been confusing to see words that look different being referred to the same thing, a participle. Is participle a "form?"


    Thank you for the detailed answer,

    B (not a teacher)
    Last edited by Brad D; 10-Feb-2014 at 20:26.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Confused: I'm not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Brad D View Post
    1. I Jumped over a fence three times.
    2. I have jumped over a fence three times.

    The verb is "jumped?" The participle is "jumped?" I'm confused why in sentence one, "jumped" is not called a participle.
    The verb in #1 is not called a participle because it is not a participle. It is the second (past-tense) form of the verb JUMP. JUMP is a regular verb, and the second form therefore has the same appearance as the third (past participle) form. If we had used an irregular verb such as FLY, the two forms would have been different:

    I flew over a fence three times.
    I have flown over a fence three times.
    3. I eat pizza everyday.
    4. I ate pizza yesterday.
    5. I have eaten pizza everyday for three years.

    The verb is "eat?" The participle is "ate?" The participle is "eaten?"
    The verb is EAT.

    In #1, we have the first person present simple eat, which is identical in appearance to the first form (base, bare infinitive).
    In #2, we have the second (past simple) form ate.
    In #3, we have the third (past participle) form eaten.

  3. ehzia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Confused: I'm not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Brad D View Post
    I wonder about this, please help.

    I jumped over a fence three times.

    Q1. What is the verb in the previous sentence?

    I have jumped over a fence three times.

    Q2. What is the verb in the previous sentence?

    Q3. What is the difference between tense and aspect?

    I would appreciate an answer from a teacher rather than a moderator. I do not mean to be rude, but I would like to hear from someone who is in a classroom. Although I am currently not a teacher, this question has been asked a few times in the past. I asked someone the question, and they told me something odd, so I'd like a current teacher to explain it to meA1:. In addition, please just answer the three questions. Please use the private messaging service for comments not related to the questions.

    Thank you so much!

    B
    A1: jumped

    A2: have jumped (auxiliary verb "have")

    A3: "TENSE refers to the absolute location of
    an event or action in time, either the
    present or the past.

    ASPECT refers to how an event or action is
    to be viewed with respect to time, rather
    than to its actual location in time." - I just copied this

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Confused: I'm not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by ehzia View Post
    I just copied this
    Please credit your source.

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    #7

    Re: Confused: I'm not a teacher

    ...and state that you are not a teacher.

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