Results 1 to 2 of 2
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Thai
      • Home Country:
      • Thailand
      • Current Location:
      • Thailand

    • Join Date: Oct 2013
    • Posts: 38
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Meaning of 'These go so well with...'

    'The tempura has such a uniquely light and crispy feel to it — let alone its flavor — and the nigiri sushi is made after it’s ordered from the table, and guests can see and taste the quality of everything from the rice to the fish. These go so well with crab as to make everything more worthwhile, as guests get a chance to enjoy Japanese cooking’s tradition of excellence.'

    What does the 'These go so well with crab as to make everything more worthwhile' mean?
    Does it mean 'These go very well with crab to make everything more worthwhile'?

    Also, I am not sure what 'these' and 'everything' refer to in that sentence.
    I assume 'these' refers to tempura and suchi, and 'everything' means overall taste, in which case the sentence would mean crab, tempura, and suchi should be eaten together to get the most delicious combination.

    Is that right?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Meaning of 'These go so well with...'

    Quote Originally Posted by xReindeer View Post
    'The tempura has such a uniquely light and crispy feel to it — let alone its flavor — and the nigiri sushi is made after it’s ordered from the table, and guests can see and taste the quality of everything from the rice to the fish. These go so well with crab as to make everything more worthwhile, as guests get a chance to enjoy Japanese cooking’s tradition of excellence.'

    What does the 'These go so well with crab as to make everything more worthwhile' mean?
    Does it mean 'These go very well with crab to make everything more worthwhile'?

    Also, I am not sure what 'these' and 'everything' refer to in that sentence.
    I assume 'these' refers to tempura and suchi, and 'everything' means overall taste, in which case the sentence would mean crab, tempura, and suchi should be eaten together to get the most delicious combination.

    Is that right?
    The writer is saying that the side dishes, including the tempura coating, rice, and sushi worked so well with the crab as to make everything better. It is not clear from the passage but the tempura might have been crab tempura.

Similar Threads

  1. does they have the same meaning, or not?
    By sykim99 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Jun-2010, 15:02
  2. The meaning
    By Sirichai in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 23-Jun-2010, 18:38
  3. meaning
    By sina in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Jul-2007, 05:42
  4. meaning
    By daisy1352 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-Jul-2007, 09:37
  5. meaning
    By daisy1352 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Jul-2007, 00:18

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •