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    #1

    comparative adjective

    What's the rule for making the comparative and superlative form of more-than-one part adjectives? Like: slow paced, fast paced, high class, etc.

    I've heard slower paced and most fast paced, and this is why I'm confused which rule I'm supposed to follow.

    Thanks,

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: comparative adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by atabitaraf View Post
    What's the rule for making the comparative and superlative form of more-than-one part adjectives? Like: slow paced, fast paced, high class, etc.

    I've heard slower paced and most fast paced, and this is why I'm confused which rule I'm supposed to follow.

    Thanks,
    Why are "slower-paced" and "most fast-paced" confusing you? The first is a comparative and the second is a superlative. They are unlikely to take the same form.

    Slow-paced.
    Slower-paced.
    Slowest-paced/Most slow-paced

    High class.
    Higher class
    Highest class.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: comparative adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Why are "slower-paced" and "most fast-paced" confusing you? The first is a comparative and the second is a superlative. They are unlikely to take the same form.

    Slow-paced.
    Slower-paced.
    Slowest-paced/Most slow-paced

    High class.
    Higher class
    Highest class.
    The question is 'When can I use more/most and when -er/-est?' Because slow has one syllable, exactly like fast. So how is it possible to make -er/-est for one of them and more/most for the other?
    I memorized some rules for making the comparative and superlative forms of one-part adjectives, but I think they don't work for two-part adjectives.

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    #4

    Re: comparative adjective

    There's nothing wrong with 'faster-paced' and 'fastest-paced.

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    #5

    Re: comparative adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    There's nothing wrong with 'faster-paced' and 'fastest-paced.
    So are both of them correct? fastest-paced and most fast-paced?
    Is this rule correct?
    For two-part adjectives we have the same rules as for the one-part adjectives? OR we always can use the both forms? OR we don't have a rule, just referring to the native people is the way? Would you please help to make a rule not to get more confused?

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    #6

    Re: comparative adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by atabitaraf View Post
    So are both of them correct? fastest-paced and most fast-paced? Yes. The version we choose depends on the context.

    For two-part adjectives do we have the same rules as for the one-part adjectives? Normally – yes.

    ​Can we always can use the both forms? Usually – yes. I'm not going to say 'always'.
    Treat two-part adjectives like one-part adjectives. In most cases you will be correct.

    It will not happen often; two-part adjectives are comparatively rare.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 13-Feb-2014 at 15:09.

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    #7

    Re: comparative adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Treat two-part adjectives like one-part adjectives. In most cases you will be correct.

    It will not happen often; two-part adjectives are comparatively rare.
    Of course you mean to refer to the first part of these adjectives, am I right? If the first part needs er/est OR more/most, we do it for the two-part adjective.

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    #8

    Re: comparative adjective

    Right.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: comparative adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by atabitaraf View Post
    So are both of them correct? fastest-paced and most fast-paced?
    Is this rule correct?
    Yes, but few people would say "most fast-paced" to avoid the '-st -st -st' sound which sounds a bit funny/repetitive. If I found myself saying, "He's the most fast-paced horse", I'd probably say, "He's the most ... er, the fastest paced horse." But they're still both right.

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