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    #1

    Difference

    for an hour or for one hour ?

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    #2

    Re: Difference

    What is the context?

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    #3

    Re: Difference

    I have been playing for an hour/ I have been playing for one hour ????????

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    #4

    Re: Difference

    Both are correct.

    I have been playing for an hour sounds more natural. IMHO
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 15-Feb-2014 at 09:39. Reason: Corrected capitalisation on "Both"

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    #5

    Re: Difference

    Quote Originally Posted by kamleshgsharma View Post
    I have been playing for an hour/ I have been playing for one hour ????????
    Note that we do not put a space after a slash so it should say "... hour/I have ..." and a single question mark is entirely sufficient. Don't put a space before a question mark.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: Difference

    In a lot of languages, 'a/an' and 'one' share the same word (un, um, uno, ein).

    In English, we only use 'one' when the actual number is significant.

    'I have been playing for an hour.' 'I'll be there in a minute.' 'I lived in New York for a month.' 'You can have a day off next week.'

    'You can have exactly one hour on the computer.' 'I want you back here in one week — not two.' 'One month in New York was quite enough.'

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