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    #1

    purchase


    Could anyone please help me to understand the meaning of the phrase below, what does refer to the underlined "it". what does may purchase the contractor? Thanks.

    In the case of the drinking fountain, if the plumbing and electrical subcontractors will contribute the
    labor to install the fountain, the general contractor may purchase it since it is arguably in his contract.
    Last edited by Sepmre; 12-Feb-2014 at 22:40.

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    #2

    Re: purchase

    It's not very well written.

    The general contractor will buy the actual fountain, while the subcontractors (plumbing and electrical) will hook it up.

    The first "it" is the fountain itself.

    The second "it" is the requirement to have a fountain in the project.

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    #3

    Re: purchase

    Thank you very much,

    here is the rest of this paragraph

    If he declines, the architect can attempt to persuade the owner to purchase the equipment.
    Persuading an owner to pay a change order for equipment when the labor is provided at no additional cost is an easier—though not
    a sure—sell. The owner may ask the architect to participate in this shared arrangement with the argument that his drinking fountain is
    more costly as a change order than it would have been if included in the bid documents.


    I'm in trouble with underlines the statement. Could you please help me with it?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by Sepmre View Post
    Thank you very much,

    here is the rest of this paragraph

    If he declines, the architect can attempt to persuade the owner to purchase the equipment.
    Persuading an owner to pay a change order for equipment when the labor is provided at no additional cost is an easier—though not
    a sure—sell. The owner may ask the architect to participate in this shared arrangement with the argument that his drinking fountain is
    more costly as a change order than it would have been if included in the bid documents.


    I'm in trouble with underlines the statement. Could you please help me with it?
    The price for "change orders" (items not in the original bid) is often much higher than identical items that were included in the original bid. For example, if several rooms are being renovated and three of them call for sinks, the sinks might be $300 each. If one later adds another sink, it might be $700.

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