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    #1

    until vs by

    Hi,

    "You must turn in your homework UNTIL next Sunday."
    "You must.................................BY next Sunday."

    Do these two sentences mean exactly the same as one another?

    Thanks!

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: until vs by

    Quote Originally Posted by LeTyan View Post
    Hi,

    "You must turn in your homework UNTIL next Sunday."
    "You must.................................BY next Sunday."

    Do these two sentences mean exactly the same as one another?

    Thanks!
    No, the first is incorrect.

    You could say: You have until next Sunday to turn in your homework.

    There is another problem. Is "next Sunday" the one that is coming up or the one after that?

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    #3

    Re: until vs by

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    No, the first is incorrect.

    You could say: You have until next Sunday to turn in your homework.

    There is another problem. Is "next Sunday" the one that is coming up or the one after that?
    It's more likely to be the one after the incoming Sunday. Because otherwise I would say "this Sunday" or "the incoming Sunday".

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: until vs by

    Quote Originally Posted by LeTyan View Post
    It's more likely to be the one after the incoming Sunday. Because otherwise I would say "this Sunday" or "the incoming Sunday".
    There is no "incoming Sunday" in English. Phrases such as "next Sunday" can be confusing. What you call "this Sunday" can be called the "next Sunday". I wouldn't, but some do.

  3. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: until vs by

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    There is no "incoming Sunday" in English. Phrases such as "next Sunday" can be confusing. What you call "this Sunday" can be called the "next Sunday". I wouldn't, but some do.
    Hello.

    I frequently use example sentences like the one in post #1 when I teach my students (,who are beginners) in my English classes.

    So, in the real world, should it be something like "You must turn in your homework by Friday, February 24th."?

    Thank you.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: until vs by

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Hello.

    I frequently use example sentences like the one in post #1 when I teach my students (,who are beginners) in my English classes.

    So, in the real world, should it be something like "You must turn in your homework by Friday, February 24th."?

    Thank you.
    Yes, if you want them to understand you.
    Tbe problem is that even the most logical of us often refer to the next Sunday coming as something other than "next Sunday", and when we do say "next Sunday" we often do not mean the Sunday in future closest to now.
    And it gets worse. Today is Friday 14th (for me). "Next Sunday" could easily be Sunday 23rd; even if on Monday 10th, "next Sunday" might have been Sunday 16th. So, "next Sunday" can change date even if there is no intervening Sunday.

    Usages are local and dependent on context. "I can't make it this weekend. Let's make it next Sunday" - obviously "next Sunday" here is the one after next. Even spouses fight over this if their preferred usage is different.

    PS: "Sunday next week" is also not good unless you know which day the hearer's week begins. Ours (Australia) begins on a Sunday, so "Sunday next week" is strictly Sun 16th.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: until vs by

    For clarity, whether in class, at work or simply making plans with your friends, give the date! Unless it's tomorrow or the day after tomorrow (in which case you can use those terms), it's much easier to say "See you on the 18th". It doesn't matter what day of the week it is - if everyone knows the date, there can be no confusion.

    I'm not saying that native speakers actually do this, of course. That would suggest we practise what we preach!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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