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  1. tzfujimino's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 2,698
    #1

    Because I can enjoy swimming in the sea.

    Hello.

    I have a question as to the usage of the word 'because'.
    I teach my students that, in writing assignments, they can't separate the dependent clause introduced by 'because' from the main/independent clause, for instance:

    1. I like summer. Because I can enjoy swimming in the sea. [wrong]

    2. I like summer because I can enjoy swimming in the sea. [correct]

    3. I like summer. This/It/That is because I can enjoy swimming in the sea. [It might not be natural, (#2 is the best) but it's correct.]

    And I know the dialogue below is correct (It's an exceptional case in which the dependent clause can stand alone):

    4. John: Why do you like summer?
    Student A: Because I can enjoy swimming in the sea.


    The problem is that one of my students used the construction shown in #3, and that her native English teacher (named 'Richard') at school corrected it to the one shown in #1. I have a strong objection to the correction.

    Am I wrong?

    Thank you.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #2

    Re: Because I can enjoy swimming in the sea.

    The construction shown in #1 is something that early writers make and should be corrected by the time they are in third grade (8 or 9 years old or so). For a teacher to "correct" the already-correct (though not as good style-wise as #2) #3 to the incorrect #1 is upsetting and should be objected to.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 16-Feb-2014 at 16:14.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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