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    #1

    G-Tea, D-Tea

    Do the following 'G-Tea' and 'D-Tea' each refer to 'ginger tea' and 'Danish tea'? Then Ginger-tea ginger biscuit? It seems strange. And what does 'soak up' mean in the context?


    I looked up at the wall of the factory cafe and there were some new items on the menu.


    * Chocolate teapot: small 2.59 pounds
    ..............
    * Add a G-Tea ginger biscuit: + 79p
    * Add a D-Tea Danish pastry: + 1.89 pound

    Now that I saw it, the pastry did sound like a tempting way to soak up some of the tea.

    Thank you.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: G-Tea, D-Tea

    My first thought is that a "chocolate teapot" is pretty useless. I certainly wouldn't pay 2.59 for it - it will melt as soon as you pour boiling water into it.

    Where is this factory? Are you sure it said what you wrote? We don't write "2.59 pounds" or "1.89 pound". We write 2.59 or 1.89.

    We don't dip Danish pastries into cups of tea. We do dip biscuits into tea.

    I don't know for sure what "G-Tea" and "D-Tea" are supposed to mean but I would guess that whoever wrote the price list has given the combinations of tea and biscuit/pastry new names.

    G-Tea = a cup of tea and a ginger biscuit
    D-Tea = a cup of tea and a Danish pastry
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: G-Tea, D-Tea

    Thank you for the help.

    Let me provide you with the related context on 'chocolate teapot'.

    "Along the way you'll read the story of a unique business: the Chocolate Teapot Company. This is a company which used pricing strategies to create a whole new product category, ... and make big profits by understanding the psychology of its customers. It's also a fictional company, so don't expect to see chocolate teapots on the shelves of your local supermarket any time soon -- but everything that happens in this book is based on real examples from other businesses."

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: G-Tea, D-Tea

    Quote Originally Posted by unpakwon View Post
    Let me provide you with the related context on 'chocolate teapot'.
    You didn't.

    When we ask for context, we mean the situation /words surrounding the the words you are asking us about that are immediately relevant to those words.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: G-Tea, D-Tea

    We need to know why the sign in the factory restaurant said "Chocolate teapot", costing 2.59 for a small one. It doesn't make any sense. I don't think they can possibly be selling a chocolate teapot - that would be ridiculous. It could be a teapot filled with hot chocolate.

    Did you really see this sign? Is it really in a factory where you work?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: G-Tea, D-Tea

    The text says that it's a fictional company and that we are unlikely to find a chocolate teapot in the local supermarket.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: G-Tea, D-Tea

    I'm lost. I'm still trying to work out if the OP actually saw this sign or if the entire piece has been taken from the same text as the stuff about a chocolate teapot in the local supermarket.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: G-Tea, D-Tea

    The text says the Chocolate Teapot Company is a fictional company, so I'm sure the teapot is also a fictional product and the factory cafe is a fictional cafe, and the situation is a fictional situation, and so on. But according to the book, there really existed companies, products, cafes, and situations similar to the above mentioned.
    The following related passage is from the chapter discussing about 'upselling.'

    "When someone has bought the product or is in the process of buying it, you can then offer them extra items that satisfy the missing values. As these are optional, you can set a high margin on them without increasing the perceived price point of the core product. Even if only a small proportion of customers choose to take up the optional item, you are likely to increase margins significantly.
    Take one of your key products and list in the table below the values that it satisfies. For each value where it is strong, look at what new item you could add to intensify this value. For example, a chocolate biscuit to intensify the 'sweetness' value of a teapot, or a head massage to intensify the 'pampering' value of a haircut.
    Then look at values where the product is weak, and look at what you could offer that might improve the product on those dimensions."

    So in the original quoted text, the chocolate teapot is a core product, and the ginger biscuit is the added product that intensifies or complements the key product.

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    #9

    Re: G-Tea, D-Tea

    They look like invented names for companies, supposedly the manufacturers of the biscuit and pastry. They often use unimaginative names or ones that contain a hint of a joke- we have an expression for something useless that is as much use as a chocolate teapot.

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    #10

    Re: G-Tea, D-Tea

    You know, you could always eat a chocolate teapot. It's not entirely useless.

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