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    #1

    A service engineer to supervise, if necessary, work on the shaft will be arranged for

    Hello all users!

    The whole sentence reads as follows:

    A service engineer to supervise, if necessary, work on the shaft will be arranged for by the Owner.

    I would like to concentrate on "a service engineer to supervise". By using "a service engineer to supervise", I mean "a service engineer who is (supposed) to supervise" or "a service engineer whose job/duty is to supervise". My question is: taking into account my comments, is "a service engineer to supervise" properly used and does it convey the meaning that I mentioned above?

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: A service engineer to supervise, if necessary, work on the shaft will be arranged

    Yes, the meaning of "supervise" is clear.

    What is not is the "if necessary."

    Will it maybe be necessary to do this work? Or maybe be necessary to have this work be supervised?

    If the latter, then the "if necessary" is misplaced.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: A service engineer to supervise, if necessary, work on the shaft will be arranged

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Hello all users!

    The whole sentence reads as follows:

    A service engineer to supervise, if necessary, work on the shaft will be arranged for by the Owner.

    I would like to concentrate on "a service engineer to supervise". By using "a service engineer to supervise", I mean "a service engineer who is (supposed) to supervise" or "a service engineer whose job/duty is to supervise". My question is: taking into account my comments, is "a service engineer to supervise" properly used and does it convey the meaning that I mentioned above?

    Thank you.
    It is OK, but what if it is not necessary. Will you hire him/her anyway?

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    #4

    Re: A service engineer to supervise, if necessary, work on the shaft will be arranged

    Maybe supervision on the part of a service engineer is optional.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: A service engineer to supervise, if necessary, work on the shaft will be arranged

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Maybe supervision on the part of a service engineer is optional.
    Don't you think the prospective employee would like to know that?

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    #6

    Re: A service engineer to supervise, if necessary, work on the shaft will be arranged

    He certainly would.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: A service engineer to supervise, if necessary, work on the shaft will be arranged

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    He certainly would.
    I would ask for more money if supervision would be part of my job.

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