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  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #1

    to have a class/to attend school

    Are you going to attend school tomorrow?

    Do you have a class tomorrow?


    What would the other substitutions be?


  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to have a class/to attend school

    They are both acceptable questions. They don't necessarily mean the same thing. The first doesn't assume there is a class. It simply asks if the person is going to go to school the next day. The second only asks if the person has one single class at some point tomorrow.

    Do you have to go to school tomorrow?
    Do you have classes tomorrow?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: to have a class/to attend school

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    They are both acceptable questions. They don't necessarily mean the same thing. The first doesn't assume there is a class. It simply asks if the person is going to go to school the next day. The second only asks if the person has one single class at some point tomorrow.

    Do you have to go to school tomorrow?
    Do you have classes tomorrow?
    Hello.

    I'd like to ask a question here.

    Does "to attend/go to school" not necessarily imply that "students (will/are going to) have a class/some classes at school"?

    1. I went to school yesterday, but I didn't have any classes. (an utterance by a student)
    2. I went to school to meet my son yesterday. (an utterance by a parent)
    3. I attend school to give lectures. (an utterance by a teacher/professor)
    4. I attended school every Monday to bring lunch for my son. (an utterance by a parent)

    #1 and #3 sound OK to me, but #2 and #4 sound a bit strange.
    Do #2 and #4 work?
    (I made up those four sentences above.)

    Thank you.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to have a class/to attend school

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Hello.

    I'd like to ask a question here.

    Does "to attend/go to school" not necessarily imply that "students (will/are going to) have a class/some classes at school"?

    1. I went to school yesterday, but I didn't have any classes. (an utterance by a student)
    2. I went to school to meet my son yesterday. (an utterance by a parent)
    3. I attend school to give lectures. (an utterance by a teacher/professor)
    4. I attended school every Monday to bring lunch for my son. (an utterance by a parent)

    #1 and #3 sound OK to me, but #2 and #4 sound a bit strange.
    Do #2 and #4 work?
    (I made up those four sentences above.)

    Thank you.
    You're right that there are better alternatives to 2 and 4. #2 would be better as "Yesterday, I went to the school to meet my son". With #4, it's true that "attended school" gives the idea of "attending educational classes in a building called a school".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: to have a class/to attend school

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    They are both acceptable questions. They don't necessarily mean the same thing. The first doesn't assume there is a class. It simply asks if the person is going to go to school the next day. The second only asks if the person has one single class at some point tomorrow.

    Do you have to go to school tomorrow?
    Do you have classes tomorrow?
    + Do you have school tomorrow?

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